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    • #37399
      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
      Keymaster
        @anastasios
        • Share the structure, the CQL sequence and the link to the results (concordance lines) below.
        • Reflect on the process of building your CQL e.g. How easy was it? Did you have to try a few times before you got it right? etc.

         

      • #37659
        Vera Duncanson
        Participant
          @vera-t

          Hello everyone

          I’ve really enjoyed building various CQL sequences and can see a lot of potential applications of this tool. For example, exploring passive structures. To give myself a more challenging task, I imagined students who are struggling with past participles of irregular verbs (that’s why past participles ending in -ed are excluded). I want to practise present/past simple/perfect but not progressive as it’s not common in the passive, and I also want to exclude passive infinitives after modal verbs leaving them for another time:

          present/past simple/perfect passive + past participle of irregular verbs

          [lemma=”be” & word!=”be|being”][tag=”VVN.*” & word!=”.*ed”]

          Here is my link.

          Note: has/have/had are not included in the KWIC

          It wasn’t difficult to build after reading the guide and practising the tasks in this unit. Now I need to keep practising not to forget :-)

        • #37670
          Anastasios Asimakopoulos
          Keymaster
            @anastasios

            Hello @vera-t! I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed this unit and found it easy to apply what you learnt from the guides. Now, regarding your CQL. You are not wrong about the progressive tenses in the passive. The structure is/are + being + past participle occurs 577 times with a relative frequency of 69.22 times per million tokens, while is/are + past participle occurs 32,670 times with a relative frequency of 3,919.02 per million tokens in the BAWE corpus. So, by examining a corpus of authentic student writing, we can make informed decisions about what to prioritise.

            Your CQL works great and I liked that you combined word, lemma, tag as well as three different symbols (! | &), so well done for trying something as advanced as this. Since you mentioned it doesn’t include the full present/past perfect forms, we can have a look at this. If you would like to include have/has/had in your CQL, you can do it by examining two tenses together as opposed to four. For example, you can search for Simple Present and Simple Past together, and Present Perfect/Past Perfect together. See links:

            is/are/was/were + past participle (link)

            has/have/had + been + past participle (link)

            However, I am going to play devil’s advocate here and say that I would personally choose to teach simple present and present perfect together, and put simple past with past perfect. So, I would probably grab a sample from each and mix and match based on student needs/the syllabus. Anyway, thank you for sharing your CQL. Keep up the good work!

            • #37757
              Vera Duncanson
              Participant
                @vera-t

                Thanks for your comments Anastasios!

            • #38013
              Rhian Webb
              Participant
                @rmwebb

                @anastasios I wish I had time today to try this out and get your invalubale feedback. your feedback has been mega useful but in a slightly envious way, it shows me just how much I don’t know how to do when I want to get efficient and accurate results from my corpus queries. But I know I am novice and must appreciate that it takes a good while to become as proficient as you are in all things corpora! It’s an absolutely fascinating area of EAP and ESAP and it feels like a door has been opened for me to vast hall which I didn’t know existed. I want to thank you so much for all your comments, suggestions, examples, links, directions, and brain power to us participants.  Are there any SIGS or associate groups I can join so I can become part of the community of practitioners in our specific area of EAP, ESAP do you know? I would love to be part of something like this and keep my hand in with people who are developing this area at a faster pace than I can envisage myself doing! I would hope to just keep up! :wacko: :-) Take good care to everyone on this course – may our paths meet again! Now I’m thinking of running a frequency wordlist search on that last expression!!!! :good:

              • #38016
                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                Keymaster
                  @anastasios

                  Hi @rmwebb thank you for your kind comments!!! You can still submit your CQL. I know it’s the last day of the course but I am at work next week and I will be able to read and comment on posts until Friday 17th. See? Our paths have just met again haha it’s not goodbye yet!

                • #38100
                  Ana Vucicevic
                  Participant
                    @ana93

                    Hi everyone!

                    Well, I have to say I am not particularly fond of combining formulas, so it was a bit demanding for me. Perhaps the practice will make it better. I have decided to check on the wishes and hypotheses constructions with the verb wish. Of course, these are just the basic searches. :negative:

                    The structure and the sequences are:

                    1) subject pronouns + the verb + unspecified element + was/were

                    [tag= “PPIS1|PPHS1|PPHS2”] [lemma= “wish”] [  ] [tag= “VBDZ|VBDR”]

                    the link

                    2) subject pronouns + the verb + unspecified element + had

                    [tag= “PPIS1|PPHS1|PPHS2”] [lemma= “wish”] [  ] [tag= “VHD”]

                    the link

                    Also, well done @vera-t!

                    Wishing you all a successful ending of the course, ending of the year and have nice holidays! :bye:

                     

                  • #38102
                    Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                    Keymaster
                      @anastasios

                      Thank you @ana93. Your CQL is quite advanced actually: you combined tags, lemmas and an unspecified token and used to pipe symbol to include alternatives, so well done! Of course, as you mentioned, with time and practice your search skills will improve, but you can also save these CQL sequences in a document and reuse in the future instead of building them from scratch. You could combine both searches into one by using the following sequence:

                      [tag=”P.*|N.*”] [lemma=”wish”] [tag=”P.*|N.*”] [tag=”V.*”] – see link here

                      I included nouns as well to see if we could find any more examples.

                      I wasn’t surprised to see such low frequencies for these two structures since BAWE is a corpus of academic written assignments (16 hits / 1.92 times per million). An examination of the concordance lines reveals that these structures tend to be used within quotation marks (lines 4, 5, 12, 13, 15 & 16) in essays or in narrative recounts (lines 6, 7, 8 and 14). These structures are more common in spoken English, general not academic, so I used BNC lab to find some examples – see here. The structure (PRONOUN) wish (PRONOUN) occurs 372 times with a relative frequency of 27.16 times per million) – click on Usage to see the concordance lines.

                    • #38179
                      Ana Vucicevic
                      Participant
                        @ana93

                        Thank you @anastasios!

                        It seems this other CQL combination you suggested brings more examples.

                        Yes, I forgot to mention the rationale behind my choice of this particular structure, but you provided it anyway. :good:   The structure is not so common in academic and written discourse, so perhaps BASE could give us a few more examples. Now I see BNC lab matches perfectly.

                      • #38574
                        Samuel Pealing
                        Participant
                          @sampea

                          Hi everyone – I’ve really enjoyed the course, and I feel really bad that I couldn’t go through it at the same pace as everyone else. This section has really given me a bit of inspiration to look for language patterns and how this can be exploited in the corpus. In the past, I’ve really only used corpora for single word searches and finding collocations, but CQL can really open new doors.

                          There are several areas that I find EAP students find challenging, and some of these are:

                          • complex noun phrases
                          • citation structures
                          • passive voice
                          • evaluation structures (e.g. this seems to…)
                          • Hedging

                          I decided to go with the first one – complex noun phrases – and explore a specific part of that: the relative clause.

                          I wanted to search for ‘noun + relative clause’, so I searched for: [tag=”N.*”] [word=”who|that|which|when|where”]. I couldn’t find a tag for this, so I used the ‘word’ function. This gave me results like: ‘idea that’ and ‘people who’.

                          I took this a step further by adding variations before the noun, such as adjective, noun and cardinal numbers (MC). I also tried combining all three of these together with the ‘pipe’, which looked like this [tag=”AT.*”] [tag=”J.*|N.*|MC.*”] [tag=”N.*”] [word=”who|that|which|when|where”], but I felt that this gave too many results, and it would be better to just focus on one of variation: [tag=”AT.*”] [tag=”J.*”] [tag=”N.*”] [word=”who|that|which|when|where”].

                          From here, we could look at certain aspects of the structure such as:

                          • what comes after the relative pronoun?
                          • when is a/the used?
                          • which relative pronoun is most frequent?
                          • which nouns use which relative pronouns?
                          • what does the relative clause add?

                          This could lead into gap fill activities such as choosing the most appropriate relative pronoun or adding information after the relative pronoun.

                           

                          Here is a link to my final search (I only used the social sciences database).

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