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    • #35497
      Nicholas Northall
      Moderator
        @nick-northall

        You are going to watch part of / a lesson. Before you do, decide which form you are going to use. Use the ones included in this unit or feel free to use your own. 

        Go to this link and choose one of the recorded lessons. Alternatively, if you are able, observe a teacher at your school or centre.

        As you watch the lesson, complete a feedback form – and a running commentary as well if you want. 

        Once you have completed the lesson, post your completed feedback form in this forum. Remember to say which lesson you observed.

      • #37489
        Jane McKinney
        Participant
          @erinaceus

          Not sure if I missed the plan for this lesson (S2670004)

          Stage/Timing

          First Listening

          Good points

          A good choice of audio text.  Very interesting and engaging with an element of fun.

          Suggestions

          Work on a pre-listening task.  E.g. check understanding of word ‘disaster site’.  Ask how long they think the speakers will say it takes to clean the house.  This adds a bit of fun and students can compare their thoughts.

          Stage/Timing

          Second listening

          Good points

          A chance to hear the recording again with a transcript.

          Suggestions

          Before you give the transcript, see what words and vocabulary the students heard and understood during their first listening.  This will help their confidence when they realise what they managed to pick out during the first listening.

          Stage/Timing

          Vocabulary work

          Good points

          Well done for working on word forms – you asked if the word was a noun and if it could be a verb

          Suggestions

          You did a lot of the work here.  Work on eliciting more from the students.  This will help you to check their understanding of some words and give them confidence to share what they do know.  Then try to activate the language.  E.g. Ask them what things they can wipe, what different smells of air freshener they know.

          Overall:

          You’re making a good effort to develop a rapport with the students but I suggest you pause on occasion to encourage interaction.  Continue to work on instruction giving.  In some places there was a good attempt at checking understanding, build on these good examples.

          Personal development:

          When I was teaching, an observer made a good recommendation to me.  He suggested I looked at the concept of ‘wait time’.  I will find an article and you can see if this would be useful for your teaching practice.

          • #37527
            Aurelia Cristiana Serban
            Participant
              @cris

              Jane, I m glad you mentioned ” wait time”….I think it is an important instruction tool and it took me a long time to master it… I still think I do not allow enough, especially if I am being observed formally or informally. I attached an extract from real  feedback a peer of mine gave me after observing a lesson 2 years ago; my impatience to get things done right chipped in the wait time  I was supposed to allow students… hopefully I managed to work on this, two years later. I also believe that teaching online makes “wait time” feel like ages, esp. when students do not engage.

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          • #37491
            Angharad Vernon-Hunt
            Participant
              @angharad

              Hi everyone

              I observed the first part of Lesson 2 only – but also couldn’t see the lesson plan so was watching a little ‘blind.’ Whilst writing the f/b I was aware that I was breaking many of the golden rules (I’ve definitely said too much, included too many areas for improvement and just generally gone overboard I think!) – but for that reason it was a really valuable lesson learnt. I’ve attached my f/b here anyway – but I would do it differently next time around.. ! Thanks.

               

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              • #37499
                Jane McKinney
                Participant
                  @erinaceus

                  Hi Angharad

                  It was interesting to read your feedback.  I’m with you, I probably would have written a lot more, I’m not sure I’ve written enough so I imagine getting a balance will come with experience, as well as depending on the purpose of the observation.

                  I also wondered whether comments should be made about some of the grammar mistakes.  In my lesson there were some problems with prepositions and although they didn’t interfere with meaning (and I know we all make grammar mistakes when we speak/write) but it was just whether it would be appropriate to point it out in terms of self study and to keep an eye on as she would probably need to be a bit more careful with those if she was teaching higher levels.

                  Jane

              • #37514
                Marcia Clarke
                Participant
                  @marcia

                  Hi everyone,
                  My context is a little different and so I will share the observation form that I am currently using. This course is actually helping me to improve how I do things in my current role. I really do think that when you highlight the positives and then suggest what can be done for improvement, the feedback is more effective. I have seen a much better interaction as a result of using this format.

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                  • #37530
                    Aurelia Cristiana Serban
                    Participant
                      @cris

                      Marcia, I enjoyed reading your clear and useful comments, esp. the “Specific Goals for further improvement” part. I prepared some post-its with your suggestions – to use in my classes next week! :yahoo:

                  • #37518
                    Marusya Price
                    Participant
                      @marusya

                      Hi everyone, I’ve just posted my comment but the forum says there’s been an error so I’m going to upload my feedback as a Word doc.

                      I observed a lesson which was recorded and posted on Youtube. I decided not to watch the video that’s been provided as I couldn’t see the students. For me seeing their faces, reactions and interaction with the teacher is very important.

                      Thank you for this assignment, Beth and Nick. I don’t remember the last time I observed another teacher’s lesson so I really enjoyed it.

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                      • #37531
                        Aurelia Cristiana Serban
                        Participant
                          @cris

                          Marusya, your comments are very comprehensive. The teacher would benefit greatly from reading these, as they are on point and very detailed.

                      • #37532
                        Aurelia Cristiana Serban
                        Participant
                          @cris

                          Mine is hot written feedback given to one of the peers I recently engaged in peer observation with. It was a F2F class.  We also did PLD/cold feedback, i.e. discussed our comments in a  F2F meeting over coffee, after both lessons had been observed. More input was exchanged, avoiding the feedback sandwich, as we trust each other and have worked together on other activities as well.

                           

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                        • #37540
                          John Rustage
                          Participant
                            @johnrustage

                            Feedback on video S2670004

                            Overall – a confident, purposeful conducting of the lesson; learners were engaged and cooperative and activities progressed smoothly in working towards the learning outcomes for the lesson (vocabulary extension and listening skills development)

                            Strengths:-
                            Phonology – modelling and light drilling of pronunciation of ‘bleach’ and ‘wipe’
                            Concept Qs re. to bleach (hair) and ‘messy’ v ‘tidy’
                            Word class distinctions – to wipe / a wipe to bleach / bleach (uncountable noun)

                            Areas to work on:-
                            Perhaps be a little more generous with time for group work (preparing for listening) eg – 2-3 mins (not 1 min)
                            (Later, the time allowed for discussion – 3 mins. was more generous)
                            Asking Ss to highlight ‘key words and phrases’ – could ‘scaffold’ this activity by eliciting 2-3 example key words / pheases before the 2nd listening

                          • #37541
                            John Rustage
                            Participant
                              @johnrustage

                              Feedback on video S2670004

                              Overall – a confident, purposeful conducting of the lesson; learners were engaged and cooperative and activities progressed smoothly in working towards the learning outcomes for the lesson (vocabulary extension and listening skills development)

                              Strengths:-
                              Phonology – modelling and light drilling of pronunciation of ‘bleach’ and ‘wipe’
                              Concept Qs re. to bleach (hair) and ‘messy’ v ‘tidy’
                              Word class distinctions – to wipe / a wipe to bleach / bleach (uncountable noun)

                              Areas to work on:-
                              Perhaps be a little more generous with time for group work (preparing for listening) eg – 2-3 mins (not 1 min)
                              (Later, the time allowed for discussion – 3 mins. was more generous)
                              Asking Ss to highlight ‘key words and phrases’ – could ‘scaffold’ this activity by eliciting 2-3 example key words / phrases before the 2nd listening.

                            • #37582
                              Nicholas Northall
                              Moderator
                                @nick-northall

                                Dear All,

                                Thanks for your sharing your completed feedback in this forum. You all picked up a number of strengths as well as offering offering advice and suggestions to support the teachers going forward.

                                We are all really glad that you enjoyed the task – I would suggest trying to observe other teachers (from the perspective of a trainer as well as a teacher/peer) as often as possible. And where possible in your own context.

                                In terms of how you approached your written feedback, there were also some great ideas which I will summarise below:

                                • Most of you have organised your feedback by first looking at the different stages of the lesson with an overall summary at the end. I personally think this is a very effective way of approaching feedback.
                                • Jane offered to share further reading tasks to help the student teacher.
                                • You used a mixture of feedback forms and prose. Even when writing prose, feedback is organised – making it easy for the teacher to read and understand it.
                                • Your tone is friendly, supportive and helpful without being condescending. Although new teachers do often need to be ‘told’ what to do, they do not want to be patronised.
                                • You all praised the teachers commenting on what they did well. This is a great confidence booster for teachers to hear – even when lessons do not go very well at all.
                                • Your feedback is developmental with ideas and suggestions to help the teachers improve. Indeed, there were some excellent suggestions to help the teachers improve their practice.
                                • Your language is clear and easy for the teachers to understand.
                                • The use of a running commentary is a very effective way to describe what happened at each stage of the lesson.
                                • The use of bullet points to organise your feedback helps to focus the teacher’s attention.
                                • Not having too many suggestions ensures that the teacher is not overwhelmed!
                                • It is a good idea to use description of what actually happened in the lesson – Angharad uses this effectively – before adding a suggestion about what the teacher can do to improve their practice.
                                • You all balanced your feedback giving an equal amount of focus to strengths and areas for improvement. This could obviously be an issue if you observe a really weak lesson; however, trying to have a equal balance of strengths and areas for improvement where possible is a good rule of thumb.
                                • All of you have ensured that your overall comment is mainly positive:).
                                • Marusya’s feedback is mainly positive with suggestions marking with a simple ‘x’. This will be a great confidence booster for the teacher.
                                • It was great to see that some of you have included real feedback from lessons you have observed.
                                • It was great to see different forms used depending on the purpose of the feedback.
                                • John put his overall comment first and then made suggestions using bullet points. This is a great way to first give the teacher an overall impression of their lesson before offers specific and detailed points. Often we tend to do this the other way around!

                                Some suggestions to consider when giving feedback:

                                • Although using prose with heading can be useful, I find that a standardised feedback form is often a better way to organise your feedback. There are several reasons, which we have covered throughout this unit, for this.
                                  I personally find using a running commentary with the time indicated is one of the best ways of structuring feedback for both the teacher and the observer. It is a great way to organise as it describes what happens at each stage (and when it happened -especially useful if the teacher has issues with timing) with comments and suggestions.
                                • Be careful of not offering suggestions that are beyond the teacher’s current ability. In the same way that we wouldn’t ask an A1 learner to use, say, the third conditional, be careful of asking new or inexperienced teachers to use techniques and approaches that may be (currently) beyond their skills.
                                • Also be aware of the language you use in your feedback. Although most of you used language that the teacher would understand, be aware of using colloquialisms that teachers from some backgrounds may not understand. Don’t forget that not all teachers you observe will be expert English users – some may only be around B2 (or lower) depending on the context in which you are working.
                                • Jane mentioned focusing on the teacher’s own language errors. you may want to pick up on this suggesting that the teacher do some form of self-study in this area. I personally think that if the target models are correct (I have observed native English speakers teach ‘could of done’) and the learners understand the teacher, it might not be an area of too much concern. Again, consider the context in which the teacher is working (i.e. the level of the learners, the purpose of the observation, when the mistake is a slip, etc).
                                • In some formal contexts, you may want to avoid using contractions such as T, Ss or TL as these may not be understood and could cause confusion.

                                Thanks again for posting here. Please do continue to post and comment on each other’s posts.

                                Cheers,
                                Nick

                                PS: We have not included the plans or materials on purpose so you could just access the lesson as you watch it – this does sometimes happen! I have attached the plan, materials and feedback for L2 to this folder. As L1 was a series of unassessed lessons, we don’t have the plan or feedback.

                              • #38026
                                NANEES ASGHAR
                                Participant
                                  @nanees

                                  I chose Lesson Number: S2670005. Attached is my feedback.

                                  Attachments:
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                                  • #38553
                                    Nicholas Northall
                                    Moderator
                                      @nick-northall

                                      Hi Nanees,

                                      Thanks for your reply to this task. I like your idea about the winning group being the one with the most answer – focus here on accuracy rather than fluency!

                                      Cheers,

                                      Nick

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