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    • #38852
      Nick Murgatroyd
      Keymaster
        @nick

        Ok, now you’ve had a chance to (briefly) experience two tools from the student’s perspective: Socrative and Quizlet. Let’s think about those now from a teaching perspective and what application they might have for our EAP students.

        You don’t have to respond necessarily to all the questions – feel free to select 1 or 2 you think are most interesting for you to answer and post your replies below:

        So, here goes:

        1. Which of the two tools do you think would be most useful to use with your students? Why?
        2. Can you think of a lesson you taught recently where one of these tools could have made the lesson more engaging for the students?
        3. Do any of these tools seem particularly suited for EAP students (rather than just general EFL students)?
        4. Can you see any potential problems/issues with using either of these tools with EAP students?
      • #40640
        Fasih Raza
        Participant
          @fasih

          Which of the two tools do you think would be most useful to use with your students? Why?

          I think Quizlet is a better one due its dual features – testing and teaching. Through Quizlet students can learn on their own pace with their own preffered modality – written or oral, matching or writing answers. However, I’m not sure if Quizlet gives teachers a report of what student did with a quiz.

          Can you think of a lesson you taught recently where one of these tools could have made the lesson more engaging for the students?

          Recently I taught a lesson to develop students discussions skills in academic contexts. We analyzed language and then my students used that language in a discussion. However, they quickly forgot the words and phrases which we analyzed. I think if I used Quizlet to practise the language, they could have processed it deeply and remember it for longer.

          Do any of these tools seem particularly suited for EAP students (rather than just general EFL students)?

          Academic vocabulary lists can easily be memorized using Quizlet.

          Can you see any potential problems/issues with using either of these tools with EAP students?

          Other than being distractive, I can’t think any other issues.

        • #40673
          James Hanlon
          Participant
            @jameshanlon

            1) Although both tools are useful, I agree with Fasih that Quizlet is the better of the two for students. I tend to emphasise the need for students to constantly learn vocab and Quizlet is a great tool for that task. I have used other flashcard apps in the past, but Quizlet has more features (including the clincher for me, which is the option for the student to play the word and heat the correct pronunciation).

            2) I would say that Socratic is better for in-class. I would usually set vocab acquisition as homework (especially because different students know different words) so I would encourage Quizlet use as individual. Having said that, is it possible to create a Quizlet that students could collaborate on and all add their own words? A class Quizlet could be a great focal point for vocabulary the whole class need. I recently did a session on linkers and it could have been fun to get students to create sets for each other (although this would have probably been a homework). Socratic could be used in any lesson I feel, but perhaps it would be a nice way to make a reading comprehension more interactive.

             

            3/4) Maybe games and trying to make things more fun can give a slightly wrong impression to EAP students. The stakes are high for many and there is a lot of work to do, so some students might feel that messing about with apps is wasting valuable time.

          • #40688
            Catherine Lewis
            Participant
              @catherine21

              I have not used Quizlet or Socratic in the classroom.

              Which of the two tools do you think would be most useful to use with your students? Why?

              I agree with Fasih in that Quizlet seems to be the better of the two. It seems to be the more versatile of the two.

              Do any of these tools seem particularly suited for EAP students (rather than just general EFL students)?

              Quizlet could be used as a quick rounding off activity at the end of an EAP class, as part of asynchronous activities before a class or to review vocabulary at the beginning of a class. Quizlet could also be used to consolidate vocabulary when supporting the teaching of academic subjects such as business or media studies.   It could also be used with foundation students who generally  have weaker English language skills.

              Can you see any potential problems/issues with using either of these tools with EAP students?

              I’m not sure that memorising vocabulary lists really helps students to learn in the long term (deep learning) it seems more akin to surface learning. Also, some EAP students may not like ‘fun activities’ as they are too similar to EFL type games and may regard the activities as a waste of time.  However, all learners have different learning styles so these tools may suit some learners. Therefore, it may be a good idea to use these tools as asynchronous learning aids.

            • #40712
              Bashar
              Moderator
                @bashar

                Thanks @James @Fasih and @Catherine for sharing your views and thoughts. Quizlet and Socrative can be useful assessment tools on various ELT courses including EAP. As @Fasih and @James pointed out quizlet allows students more autonomy in their approach to learning vocabulary i.e. flashcards, testing themselves, games, spelling practice, audio/pronunciation, etc. In this way, quizlet provides Ss with multiple encounters with the target items which could potentially aid with retention. Thus, Quizlet lends itself to an individual approach to learning and could be used before or after tasks, depending on your aims and purposes e.g. working on keywords before reading an academic article or watching an online lecture. In terms of classroom management, Socrative seems to offer a few advantages over quizlet. These include:

                • using it as a formal assessment tool (online or in a downloadable PDF version)
                • providing teachers with real-time formative feedback to check students’ understanding and progress thus helping to identify areas of difficulties.
                • engaging students with in-class fun (competitive) quizzes (Space race) if appropriate.
                • Creating different rooms for different groups
                • Sharing quizzes with other colleagues to import and adapt according to their learners needs.

                @Catherine, you make a good point that our use of technology should be underpinned by a sound pedagogical approach informed by the learning context and aimed at accomodating learner needs and styles.

              • #40717
                Jamie Sullivan
                Participant
                  @jamie

                  Hi everyone,

                  Great to read others thoughts on these two resources. I have experience using Quizlet but am new to Socratic.

                  Which of the two tools do you think would be most useful to use with your students? Why?

                  In my experience, Quizlet is an effective vocabulary focused tool that allows greater flexibility in terms of teacher prep or for asynchronous use. A particularly useful facet of both is they allow in-lesson checking of understanding which is invaluable, particularly for lower level students.

                  Do any of these tools seem particularly suited for EAP students (rather than just general EFL students)?

                  Perhaps Quizlet has the potential for use in conjunction with key vocabulary resources to facilitate students in creating their own bank of academic vocabulary e.g., transition or linking devices using the Manchester Phrasebank might be an enjoyable and ultimately beneficial group task to reaffirm work in this area.

                  Can you see any potential problems/issues with using either of these tools with EAP students?

                  I agree with @Catherine, in my experience, EAP students demand, or certainly put more perceived value, in academic activities that focus on teacher input and direct feedback on their work. I can see problems arising with, the EFL type gamification elements of both resources. They would perhaps be best utilised as an additional revision tools.

                   

                • #40753
                  Nick Murgatroyd
                  Keymaster
                    @nick

                    Hi @jamie Thanks for posting and sharing your ideas. It’s good to hear you already have (positive) experience with Quizlet and have seen first-hand how it can benefit students. I do think you also raise an interesting point, also raised by @catherine21, about how students might view them negatively as being gamified. This is a tricky question to answer and obviously depends on your students, but I think it’s worth considering the following:

                    • do we as EAP teachers impose a “seriousness” that we perceive as necessary for EAP but students may not? I remember when we had a British Council inspection of our pre-sessional course that one of the headlines of their feedback was that our lessons were too serious and belaboured under the misconception that EAP could not be fun. Obviously, this is just one opinion, and you may wonder how you can make some elements fun, but it links into questions about how we use gamification across the university – in the past, teaching may mostly have been through traditional lecture and seminar, but in meetings with other learning technologists I can see that most departments now use elements of gamification, such as tools like Socrative and Kahoot in lectures, online quizzes, even geomapping. That suggests that gamification is becoming embedded in the wider curriculumm and something students are less likely to resist than we think.
                    • Students do appreciate direct feedback on their work, but there is always the question of how much work a teacher can respond to. Particularly in terms of revision or vocab input, I wonder if weaker students may get more out of the instant feedback and chances to restart that Quizlet offers than they do from a typical class situation where the teacher controls the pace and, in feedback, one student’s answer is the signal to move on to the next question.

                    There is a worry, of course, that Quizlet lends itself to surface learning (much like the EFL terminology exercise in Delta Module One) and that students don’t benefit from learning lists, but there is some research that suggests learning high frequency word lists like the AWL can be of more benefit to students in the longterm than the more traditional EAP task of picking out language from texts. My own feeling is that there’s probably a halfway house, where students follow Lewis’s model of picking out the language from the AWL that’s most relevant to them and boost it with more specialist / discipline-specific terms they encounter through their reading, but Quizlet then becomes a great tool for them to help teach themselves these terms – I imagine five minutes on the app while they wait for a bus is more effective and engaging than digging out the kind of paper lists I used to try and boost my critical vocab for my doctorate.

                  • #41014
                    Karolina Jasinska
                    Participant
                      @karolinajas

                      Hi everyone,

                       

                      1. I think both these tools could be useful but in different ways. I agree with what @Bashar mentioned above about Quizlet being great for individual study be it before or after classes. It is definitely a clever tool to practise your vocabulary. I prefer using Socrative in class as it adds variety to the lessons. Students generally enjoy quizzes and find them more engaging, and that has been my experience with Socrative.

                      4. From my experience learning English and Spanish, flashcards do not always work for all students. I think it’s mainly about seeing how the word is used in context that helped me learn vocabulary most effectively. So that could be a potential problem for some students. I agree with @Catherine that not all learners like ‘fun’ quizzes and that they may regard them as a waste of time. I think the key is doing a variety of tasks and not devoting the whole session to a Socrative quiz or simply using these tools as homework/independent study time/revision tools.

                    • #41126
                      Vasiliki Zinonos
                      Participant
                        @vasiliki

                        Hello all,

                        I agree with @Karolina and @Bashar that Quizlet might be best used as a pre- or post-lesson task. It is indeed a tool of polymorphic functions, which promotes students’ autonomy and independency in learning vocabulary. Comparatively, Socrative can be a fun tool for in class assessments, which can test not only vocabulary, but also can be useful for review lesson quizzes, lesson reflections or lesson warm-ups.

                        I prefer Socrative due to the fact that students get real-time feedback, performance results, but also the teacher can monitor progress during an in-class task.

                        I believe both tools can be used in an EAP context perhaps in different situations, so that there is variation and students have experience of both, which can make their learning more interesting.

                        As far as limitations of these tools, maybe students find it hard to connect the material they are already studying to the information they are presented with on Quizlet. Also, not all of the students will retain the information/words they have just learned – plus not all of the students are visual learners and retain information the same way. Although Socrative might be a bit more of a brain-teaser, if students are not prepared for an assessment, their performance will not be great and then perhaps the assessment will not have served its purpose.

                      • #41172
                        xu ping
                        Participant
                          @egp22px

                          Hello, everyone,

                          From my own perfective, I hope I can use both these two learning devices  to  get my students  involved both in pre-class ,in-class and after-class activities. As for Quizlet , I think  I can use flashcard function  to help my sutdents to get familiar with the  new words and phrases in the reading text before class. But when it comes to face to face instructions , I ‘d like to use its quizelet live/spelling/matching functions as a lead-in activity to assess their leaning.and  after that I might use the Socrative for a comprehensive online test, as we can have more choices to make on this app. When testing, I can choose questions by myself, including multiple choice, short answer,T/F etc.. and also the testing time and space is of no limit. Students can do it on their own either in class or after class.

                           

                           

                           

                        • #41234
                          11007807@qq.com
                          Participant
                            @11007807qq-com

                            From my perspective, both tools aiming at different tasks are quite amazing for my students. Quizlet is powerful for before- or after- class vocabulary tasks, and Socrative can be very funny for in-class assignments. Further practices and reflections  are needed before my proficient operation of these two skillful tools.

                          • #41248
                            Nick Murgatroyd
                            Keymaster
                              @nick

                              Thanks for posting @karolinajas @vasiliki @egp22px and @11007807qq-com It’s good to see a range of opinions on these tools. One thing that comes out here is the question of how much time we should devote to these tools in the classroom. Thankfully, most of us are past the days when we had to book a computer room to use any tech (and therefore felt we had to structure whole lessons around using the machines to the maximum possible), so could these tools be used for short bursts instead? How would you feel, for example, about setting up a Quizlet revision activity for fast-finishing students to work on while their classmates complete the main activity? If nothing else, I’d really recommend having a go with Quizlet Live when you next have the chance to teach face-to-face – the competitive and co-operative elements of it really seem to boost learning.

                            • #42099
                              Ling Yao
                              Participant
                                @egq22ly

                                1. Which of the two tools do you think would be most useful to use with your students? Why?

                                I think Quizlet will be better for those highly motivated and self regulated language learners,  they will find it really useful to memorize the jargon, link  vocabulary to its  explanations. However I find it less communicative and engaging.

                                As a student, I did enjoy my experience with Socrative. I have used some higher order thinking skills – to compare and contrast information of different people- though with not very satisfactory results. I still consider it could be a brilliant ice breaking activity in class –  as for students who have the opportunity to see each other  in the classroom, they may take an interest to learn some information about their peers, which makes the language activities authentic and meaningful.

                              • #42599
                                Haibing Hou
                                Participant
                                  @ellen-hou

                                  Quizlet is very helpful. Flash card is very suitable for students to prepare for the exam. It is also a secret weapon to get high scores. The exam is to test everyone’s familiarity with the knowledge points in the textbook. Quizlet can not only help students improve the scores efficiently,but also help them remember the knowledge for a long time.

                                • #42876
                                  Ying Zhong
                                  Participant
                                    @kathie

                                    Which of the two tools do you think would be most useful to use with your students? Why?

                                    I have tried both tools just now and I found them quite interesting and useful. Quizlet gives more fun in helping students memorize words and phrases, for each  unit of  word study is immediately followed by various activities for reviewing and consolidating what they learnt before.

                                     

                                    Can you think of a lesson you taught recently where one of these tools could have made the lesson more engaging for the students?

                                    I think these tools are useful for any course for foreign language learners such as Business English which is a course for English major students to learn specialized English.

                                     

                                    Can you see any potential problems/issues with using either of these tools with EAP students?

                                    I didn’t explore all the menu tools yet so I am not sure whether questions with open answers can be set in the quiz.

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