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    • #39645
      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
      Keymaster
          @anastasios

          Share your reflections on any of the following questions:

          • How did you do in the task?
          • What do you think the purpose of the task was?
          • How would you adapt the task if you had to use it in class?
          • What activity would you do as a follow up? (something that involves the use of Word Sketch and/or Concordancing)
          • Add your own reflections…
        • #43424
          Chris Richards
          Participant
              @chris-richards

              This was such a cool task!

              • I got 8/8 – but it did really make me think
              • The task seems to be encouraging students to think about how some words are more likely to occur in the same context as other words.
              • The main adaptation I can think of would be simply the topic(s) to be suitable for my students. In addition, I might ask students to give each visual a title for the topic they think it represents.
              • As a follow-up task, I would ask them to add words that belong to topic areas, first based on what they can think of and then by making use of Word Sketch to a) check and b) extend further
            • #43425
              Anastasios Asimakopoulos
              Keymaster
                  @anastasios

                  Glad you found it cool @chris-richards. Your post made me think too actually, so thank you for this. You mentioned ‘topics’ and this got me intrigued. The visuals in the task show the collocates of develop in the four disciplinary groups (AH, SS, PS, LS), which of course can cover so many different topics, but there’s a way to see what topics these collocates come from. I’ve added a screenshot below. Can you guess the steps I followed? ;)

                  • #43731
                    Chris Richards
                    Participant
                        @chris-richards

                        You’ve used the subcoropora option @anastasios, I think. I don’t have access to the tool with the open access version, but that also seems like a “cool” option :)

                      • #43733
                        Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                        Keymaster
                            @anastasios

                            @chris-richards I used the Subcorpora that is available for the open access version. Just go to Word Sketch – Advanced and select AH, SS, PS or LS.

                            But, in order to see the topics, I went to the concordance of a specific collocation (develop + theory) and clicked on the i button (the View line detail options button) (step 1). Then, I unticked the Text genre (step 2) and ticked the Document title (step 3) before saving (step 4). Once you are back to your concordance, you can hover your mouse over the i button and you will see the full title of the document popping up.

                        • #43547
                          Paul Middlemas
                          Participant
                              @paul-m

                              How did you do in the task?

                              –        All correct, but definitely not straightforward.

                              What do you think the purpose of the task was?

                              –        To offer a more visual representation of how a corpus tool works, so sts can more easily see relationships between words.

                              –        Perhaps makes the idea of using corpora more appealing and accessible when displayed this way.

                              –        Display benefits of learning new language with its collocates and in context (and perhaps introduces the idea of recording new language this way), rather than learning words in isolation.

                              How would you adapt the task if you had to use it in class?

                              –        I might change the level / topics.

                              –        Perhaps reducing the amount of language in each circle…

                              What activity would you do as a follow up? (something that involves the use of Word Sketch and/or Concordancing)

                              –        There could be a follow up task (such as a gap fill) so that students can identify/place the words in context.

                              –        With Word Sketch, students choose a word closely connected to their discipline and create their own visuals. They could perhaps recreate this activity for their peers to complete….

                            • #43730
                              Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                              Keymaster
                                  @anastasios

                                  Thank you @paul-m for your ideas. Unfortunately, the free access to BAWE doesn’t allow us to select a specific discipline; we can only see the broad disciplinary group. The institutional membership does allow to filter for a specific discipline, but that ends very soon (at some point this month actually) . As mentioned in my response to @chris-richards, you can only make the search discipline specific after you access the concordance of a collocate. By the way, if you want to present students with fewer collocates, you can adapt the number of collocates showing for a word by sliding the dot to the right/left (min 1 collocate; max 30 collocates) and adjust the font size if necessary.

                                • #44169
                                  Anna Smajdor
                                  Participant
                                      @anna-smajdor

                                      Hello,

                                      • How did you do in the task?

                                      8/8. First, I looked for similarities among 8 collocates. Then I compared each pair with vocabulary sets in the visuals.

                                      • What do you think the purpose of the task was?

                                      The task could be an interesting introduction to a class about disciplinary languages. You can show students with this task that there are both similarities and differences between language variations.

                                      • How would you adapt the task if you had to use it in class?

                                      After doing the exercise students could read 4 short texts that represent each disciplinary language.

                                      • What activity would you do as a follow up? (something that involves the use of Word Sketch and/or Concordancing)

                                      Then their task could be to look for other words common in all four variations such as develop. Then we would compare students’ answers with the search results obtained with Sketch Engine.

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