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    • #32257
      David Read
      Keymaster
          @david

          Please share your thoughts below on the following two questions…oh, and just one thing. I’m not particularly precious about my own teaching, so if there are things you felt could have been done differently or better, I’m happy to hear them ?

          1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

          2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

        • #33146
          Vera Duncanson
          Participant
              @vera-t

              1) Very realistic, because I have lessons when I’m given free hand to work on whatever I think useful for my students. My students just submitted a formative reading-into-writing essay and I can use similar activities to get them to check their collocations.

              Technical limitations  – no computer classroom; can be solved by borrowing university laptops (students have easy access to this facility).

              2) Introduce students to Flax and get them to check collocations from their own writing.

            • #33232
              Ana Vucicevic
              Participant
                  @ana93

                  First of all, I find your explanations are quite systematic for several reasons:

                  1) the selection of the text: I believe one of the best ways for students to learn something about their own language output is through their own or texts of their colleagues (it lowers their affective filter).

                  2) a gradual increase in complexity: you slowly introduced more complex assignments, relying on the previous exercise.

                  3) attention to various learning styles: sometimes providing a number of textual examples of language use can be demanding; the visual moment keeps their attention.

                  4) the active role of learners: they actively learn, share ideas, ask for more clarifications.

                  As for the classroom, I am not a teacher, but I recently researched ESAP (students of maths, physics, informatics) and, given their respective disciplines and involvement with calculations, computers and the everyday dynamism of their professions, I think these corpus tools would be refreshing and closer to their student and professional needs. I would definitely reflect on raising their metalinguistic awareness. I have observed that when taught traditionally on the notions of nouns, participles and so on, they find it a bit dull. On the other hand, they like the systems, the patterns (:D), the terms (they have a lot of these in their own sciences), and, more importantly, they like to see those terms applied in definite contexts, so I believe the corpus tools you presented here could make linguistic concepts and their uses in concrete examples more transparent, meaningful and realistic to them. In this case, due to language proficiency issues, I would probably first introduce some notions traditionally and use some other interactive material (handouts which might illustrate how the tools work).

                  Sorry for this lengthy post :-(

                   

                  • #34405
                    Babruwan Kore
                    Participant
                        @babruwan

                        Hello Ana,

                        Yes, using our students’ writing in teaching stimulates the learning environment. However, we should be careful when we use our students’ writing. In some cases, we may need learners’ permission as some learners may not like to discuss their writing in public. The best strategy is motivating learners to use their own texts, as shown in the video.

                    • #33856
                      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                      Keymaster
                          @anastasios

                          Thank you @vera-t and @ana93 for your contributions and there’s no need to apologise for the length by the way; we appreciate reflection as it allows us to understand our practices better. You raised great points, such as contextualising the use of corpus tools/techniques by asking students to apply them to their own writing but also considering the incremental nature of learning these skills and implementing them with relative ease. I was also interested a couple of things you both implied, that is the restrictions imposed by our contexts and its aspects e.g. the syllabus, assessments, technological resources and the students’ background and academic/linguistic needs. For example, would computer science students be less reluctant and more interested in using corpus tools than philosophy students would?

                          • #34462
                            Vera Duncanson
                            Participant
                                @vera-t

                                I agree Anastasios, this is something that would be interesting to observe.

                            • #33884
                              Judith Gorham
                              Participant
                                  @judith-gorham

                                  I like the way the 3 tools took the students more deeply into the collocation :yes: .

                                  What strikes me is the length of time to explore one lexical item. Especially online, time is very short and this kind of activity doesn’t really lend itself to flipped learning, at least when it’s first introduced. If the students were in their discipline groups it would be more feasible. And hopefully we’ll be back on campus soon!

                                  Although I do see that it’s motivating for students to look at collocations in their own texts, would the tools not work really well with a published text?

                                  I noticed that feeding back orally, students struggled to pronounce/understand some of the new lexis which collocated with renewable energy. How do you avoid overloading them with new lexis which may be less useful?

                                • #33955
                                  Karl Hannay
                                  Participant
                                      @karl-hannay

                                      I think I’d find it useful to have access to the full worksheet that was used with the video?

                                      I’ve looked briefly at the material and it looks very helpful. I’d probably concentrate more on the AWL and encouraging students to look for further examples in the concordances for vocabulary studied in class. I think showing them the basic functionality of these tools could help them with their independent learning. Like Judith time is very limited in my own particular circumstances so probably couldn’t spend too long on these activities in class but very useful tools for students to enable students to take their learning further.

                                    • #33956
                                      Manuel Flores Lasarte
                                      Participant
                                          @manu

                                          I think this can be a very useful tool to use with students, especially in those one-to-one sessions in which students come to check their writing. Putting some of the student’s text into Webcorp live and then going through the different steps to check their own writing can really help our students in their independent writing. Going through the different steps of using Flax as indicated by Vera would be key.

                                          As mentioned by Judith, introducing these tools can be time consuming but I think that only happens at the beginning. Once learners are used to the tools, I think they can really benefit from them.

                                          Tips that I like:

                                          – Using their own texts to check their own language.
                                          – Checking word frequency to help learners identify if the lexis used is related to the assignment question.
                                          – Helping students navigate these complex websites with guiding questions and worksheets.
                                          – Using the examples with the word(s) to guess meaning from context.
                                          – I hadn’t thought about the different learning preferences, but using these tools can add variety and really appeal to more analytical/visual students as pointed out by Ana.

                                        • #34003
                                          Yuqin Ni
                                          Participant
                                              @ziyinini

                                              These tools are very exciting and refreshing, learners can get assistance in such aspects as academic writing, collocations learning. In addition, they could be applied in teachers’ language research.

                                            • #34164
                                              Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                              Keymaster
                                                  @anastasios

                                                  Great points and questions everyone @judith-gorham @karl-hannay @manu @ziyinini

                                                  It is very important not to overload students as @judith-gorham mentioned. This can be done by focussing on a few lexical items as opposed to long vocabulary lists as well as aspects that address the intended learning objectives e.g. collocation and corpus skills. It is an inevitable choice we have to make as teachers; we can’t cover every possible aspect in one lesson. For example, I tend to do pronunciation demonstration and drilling as a pre-listening activity to help students identify keywords when listening to a lecture later. But, you are right Judith – this activity would need to be adapted for an online environment, that is students going through a self-study guide with a few tasks and preparing notes to compare and discuss when they meet their classmates and the teachers online.

                                                  Regarding, learner autonomy as @karl-hannay and @manu mentioned, I would probably have to say that an initial demonstration of the tool in class might be a good idea. It would help contextualise their use, deal with technical questions and even motivate learners. We do talk about learner autonomy a lot these days, but it’s worth remembering that autonomy is a construct that comes in various degrees, can take place inside our classrooms too, and it’s not just a matter of putting learners in a context that requires them to be autonomous. What are your thoughts on this? Or, perhaps thinking about our own learner autonomy too e.g. when we are involved in continuous professional development opportunities.


                                                  @ziyinini
                                                  that’s true – teachers can do their own research too. Not with Flax perhaps, but Sketch Engine, the corpus tool we will focus on from next week, has been used by many researchers in corpus linguistics. For example, Baker, Gabrielatos and McEnery (2013) used Sketch Engine (Word Sketch) to examine collocations of the word Muslim in a 143 million word corpus of British newspaper articles, as part of their critical discourse analysis study. So, yeah the potential is there for those teachers who are interested in applying these skills to other fields outside teaching.

                                                  By the way, feel free to comment on each other’s posts too. It is not compulsory but if you do have some time, I’m sure you will end up having lovely conversations.

                                                  References

                                                  Baker, P., Gabrielatos, C. and McEnery, T. (2013) ‘Sketching Muslims: A corpus driven analysis of representations around the word ‘Muslim’ in the British press 1998-2009’, Applied Linguistics, 34(3), pp. 255–278.

                                                • #34261
                                                  Liane Sandrey
                                                  Participant
                                                      @liane

                                                      I liked the connection between the three tools and the lesson itself. Students had a clear purpose which helped them to navigate these new tools. I also like the ‘novelty’ for students in using online tools rather than the more traditional dictionary. Hopefully, these tools could be integrated into students learning arsenal outside of the classroom.

                                                      I see pharmacy students for 2 hours a week, and one concern I would have is the length of time it takes to explore one term. However, it would be beneficial to students to master the common collocations found in life sciences. I am concerned that I may overload students with new words (I think Judith mentioned this) as already these students have a significant vocabulary load.

                                                      I liked the pace of the lesson and using materials with direct relevance to the students. Ownership of materials used in the lesson is motivating for students. I’m looking forward to exploring these tools in my classroom. (If anyone was analysing my comment, I think the word ‘tool’ would come up more than might be expected). :-)

                                                       

                                                    • #34275
                                                      Kim Pedersen
                                                      Participant
                                                          @anoshakim

                                                          I can see that these comparatively simple tools would potentially support peer review and improving first drafts of essays/summaries-I like the discovery element. It’s useful to show a controlled example in this way and I appreciate the idea of separating the task onto a new doc-though not sure that when students use their own work they will know what to pull out from the information, which might miss the “ta-da” moment.  It does seem time consuming, but so is any vocab focused lesson, so modelling tools seems the way to go.It’s clearly more evidence based than using a dictionary or dare we say it a translation tool. And has the possibility to be more subject specific than the AWL. Would definitely be worth the investment for Doc College students, if I could present it in practical (and bite size chunks).

                                                        • #34295
                                                          Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                          Keymaster
                                                              @anastasios

                                                              Thank you @liane and @anoshakim for adding to our conversation.


                                                              @liane
                                                              the word tools occurred 5 times in your post (179 words), but it was only fifth place, following the (13), I (9), students (9) and to (6), all of which bring together the main elements of your post: you, students, the tools and their purpose – hope you liked the mini-analysis ;) Frequency as well as collocations can reveal a lot of information about a piece of writing. For example, the word cloud in the video revealed how ‘renewable energy’ is constructed in discourse e.g. China, development, pollution, potential, in this case the student’s essay e.g. introduction, article. But, to go back to the issue of overload, we can see that David overcame this by focussing on two colligations e.g. verb + renewable energy and noun + of + renewable energy. It is very important to keep the students focussed on a specific aspect, whether we are using a corpus tool or even a dictionary. Finally, I was very interested in two words in your post (here is the corpus linguist in me): the word master and arsenal (great metaphor by the way), as they reveal how we might perceive learning.


                                                              @anoshakim
                                                              I’d agree with you. It seems a little time-consuming, but as you said, the lesson aims to model the tool in order to make students more autonomous learners. I definitely do not do this in every single lesson I teach haha It is interesting you mentioned translation tools too. I have used them in lessons before to compare them with other tools e.g. online dictionary, collocation bank, etc. and demonstrate the issues automatic L1⟶L2 translation tools create, both for collocations and syntax. Have you used them before?

                                                              You can post over the weekend as well, but we will check the forum on Monday – most people tend to catch up with courses at the weekend (I do that :P). If you can’t decide which reading to do, I’d recommend the chapter by Sripicharn (2010), as it links really well with our next unit on concordancing.

                                                              • #34404
                                                                Babruwan Kore
                                                                Participant
                                                                    @babruwan

                                                                    Hello Kim,

                                                                    You are right. These tools can be used to improve the first draft. I am also of the opinion that the discovery element maximises and cements learning. However, it is time-consuming. The challenge is how to convince  our students to spare some time doing such things

                                                                  • #34414
                                                                    Kim Pedersen
                                                                    Participant
                                                                        @anoshakim

                                                                        Yes, that is it-and it’s all in our delivery and how we introduce it or drip feed it in-what to leave out is as challenging as what to leave in!

                                                                    • #34393
                                                                      Kim Pedersen
                                                                      Participant
                                                                          @anoshakim

                                                                          Hi there,  yes,  I have tried to demonstrate  the general limits of translation tools and dictionaries in class, but am not sure I have convinced many so fat that corpus tools are better, because I have been confused by my own explanations!  (that’s why I’m doing the course).  I’m not surprised students do use translation tools though, and it’s difficult to know how much better some of these tools are actually getting. At some point I think we will need to explore what translation tools are good for because they are not going away.

                                                                          • #34461
                                                                            Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                            Keymaster
                                                                                @anastasios

                                                                                @anoshakim I think that translation tools can help students explore differences between L1 and the target language, but of course they come with their own limitations too. Now, whether teachers feel comfortable, or (dare I say) approve of them, is another issue. It’s interesting though that teachers tend to condemn them or forbid their use when universities do not have clear policies regarding their use.

                                                                            • #34394
                                                                              Rhian Webb
                                                                              Participant
                                                                                  @rmwebb

                                                                                  My first request (in a make-believe world) would be for all students to have dual monitors so that they can shift information around between the websites, tools, documents, dictionaries, and manipulate the information more easily.  Obviously, this would be expensive for any institution or individual, so I doubt that’ll ever happen.

                                                                                  Second, I think it would be intriguing for educators to see if students could actually write a short text, sentence by sentence, from using their analysis of words they are interested in, or confused by, or are curious about. It would be quite a challenge for them (and for me as their guide) to achieve this, but I have a feeling the process and finished text would be fascinating. From doing this, perhaps it would help to convince students of the power of learning how to master these tools and skills in preparation for writing longer texts as seen in theses or dissertations in master and doctorate degrees.

                                                                                  I also like the idea of students generating word clouds themselves. I’d be interested to record their discussions of a topic (online) and then capture the words they used, and then put those words through a word cloud tool. The idea would be to see if the students could take the top 5 words from the word cloud and use various corpus tools to write a concise and coherent text. It’d be interesting too if the text that they wrote could be then compared with results taken from a spoken corpus. I like the idea of them noticing/realising that their hard work in using the corpus tools could improve their speaking skills as well as written proficiency.

                                                                                  After mastering these tools and developing an adequate proficiency in the skills required to demonstrate/teach students how to use them, I hope to move on to the next level of creating activities that reduce the amount of screen time for the class, and heighten the problem-solving approach of working through a word puzzle of their own choosing.  I like the idea of students creating word puzzles for each other to solve. I really don’t know at this stage if that is feasible, but it could be quite a lot of fun and it could mean that their learning activities are constantly evolving. Hopefully, it would encourage a more personalised involvement with the concepts, tools and skills which can be shared with others.

                                                                                   

                                                                                   

                                                                                  • #34451
                                                                                    Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                                    Keymaster
                                                                                        @anastasios

                                                                                        Thank you for your wonderful reflections @rmwebb! I would perhaps like to comment on your word puzzle idea. I agree with you; task-creation has a place in the classroom and it can motivate students to examine their own texts. The simplest thing you could do is show them how to use gap fill making tools such as the ones on EAP Foundation (Smith, 2020) – see links New Academic Word List and Academic Collocation List. Have you used them before?

                                                                                         

                                                                                      • #35612
                                                                                        Rhian Webb
                                                                                        Participant
                                                                                            @rmwebb

                                                                                            @anastasios, Thank you for recommending these. I kept meant to use these over my time as a language teacher but never really saw how I could hang it to something which progress past this tool. I just recently introduced my Chinese students to the AWL, so this would be perfect to do with the AWL highlighter as well as NAWL and ACL. By the way, how many @an93’s are there in this forum? It seems we have many variations of the derivative @ana93.  In fact, you responded to me as @ana930 but I’m @rmwebb! I don’t suppose it really matters, but it might cause some confusion amongst the participants especially for @ana93!

                                                                                          • #35613
                                                                                            Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                                            Keymaster
                                                                                                @anastasios

                                                                                                Hi Rhian thank you for bringing this to my attention. On my end, it looks like I have used the username rmwebb, so it sounds like a glitch. I will consult David on this and get back to you. I think it has happened before with our previous cohorts.

                                                                                            • #34403
                                                                                              Babruwan Kore
                                                                                              Participant
                                                                                                  @babruwan

                                                                                                  Hi All,

                                                                                                  1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

                                                                                                  Because of the pandemic, we are still teaching online. I personally feel that it will be difficult to use this tool when teaching online as some of my students do not have a reliable internet connection. However, this can be tried out in a face-to-face classes.

                                                                                                  2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

                                                                                                  I would like to pull out the relevant examples and use them while teaching. This can save our time.

                                                                                                  • #34459
                                                                                                    Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                                                    Keymaster
                                                                                                        @anastasios

                                                                                                        Thank you for your thoughts @babruwan. You raised an important point that I am sure a lot of us would find very relevant, especially having had our lessons/programmes ‘migrate’ online in the past two years. I wouldn’t personally encourage teachers to demonstrate these tools ‘live’ by screen sharing, for reasons of connectivity as you mentioned. But, there are ways of working around this, such as providing students with concise guides that include visuals, examples and tasks, which is something that our course hopefully models for you.

                                                                                                    • #34411
                                                                                                      Karl Hannay
                                                                                                      Participant
                                                                                                          @karl-hannay

                                                                                                          I still can’t see the practical application of using this Word Cloud to determine frequency of words used in a student text? Could anyone explain the value of this again?

                                                                                                          I can see the point of the second or third activity where the collocation ‘renewable energy’ is looked at in more detail as it could build up students language around this term even though it does appear rather time consuming to look at all the different ways this term is used in real discourse.

                                                                                                        • #34430
                                                                                                          Judith Gorham
                                                                                                          Participant
                                                                                                              @judith-gorham

                                                                                                              Karl, I wasn’t sure about the word cloud either. I suppose it would show which words were used a lot but not any evaluation of this. :scratch:

                                                                                                            • #34434
                                                                                                              Karl Hannay
                                                                                                              Participant
                                                                                                                  @karl-hannay

                                                                                                                  Thanks for your response, Judith. Yes, perhaps Anastasios (I hope I’ve spelt your name correctly) could explain the benefit 0f this word cloud :wacko: ?

                                                                                                                • #34438
                                                                                                                  Ana Vucicevic
                                                                                                                  Participant
                                                                                                                      @ana93

                                                                                                                      Hi,

                                                                                                                      Yes, @anastasios and @manu, I believe that disciplinary environment may point to learning preferences. The groups I observed liked illustrations, shapes, drawings, colours – something concrete, definite and visual. The lecturer used numerous symbols from formal logic, graphs, different charts, classifications to make grammar and lexis points more understandable, more connected. It made the language recyclable. It immediately rang a bell when I saw wordcloud – I remember they used something similar when covering some language notions related to statistics and distribution.

                                                                                                                      As for what @babruwan suggested, yes, definitely, we should take account of them (not) being comfortable with sharing their writing. A colleague of mine introduced some anonymised examples from the previous years and found out that students were able to identify themselves with their colleagues, found  some constructions or vocabulary their colleagues had already used closer to the language they would probably use. They got more involved. Now, there is always that i+1 issue (Krashen)- I believe the teacher can resolve this and that corpus tools may be one way to do it: focusing on forms in the output and adding more complex ones in the process.  :-)

                                                                                                                       

                                                                                                                      • #34458
                                                                                                                        Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                                                                        Keymaster
                                                                                                                            @anastasios

                                                                                                                            Thank you @ana93. Yes, I would too argue that using work written by their peers is a more realistic, achievable model than the published work of expert writers e.g. research journals. But, you are right, some initially might be reluctant to share their own work if they are not used to this approach that requires collaboration, reflection and peer feedback. I would say that most students seem fine with the idea of sharing their own homework, but that’s my own personal experience and teaching context.

                                                                                                                        • #35204
                                                                                                                          Cristina Pennarola
                                                                                                                          Participant
                                                                                                                              @pennar

                                                                                                                              Hello everybody and thank you for your ideas and comments!

                                                                                                                              Taking advantage of the fact that many of my students are online on the Teams platform and there are enough computers in our laboratoryfor those who attend in person , I was able to adapt some Webcorp activities with two groups of students, intermediate and advanced, with very different results.

                                                                                                                              a) With the group of undergrads, after a brief introduction to Webcorp and corpus tools, I asked them to go to Webcorp and check the word ‘climate’ on the Guardian platform. Many articles were retrieved and we were able to identify some recurrent patterns such as climate change, protest, anxiety, crisis, disaster, fight, etc. etc.( This activity was also a warm up to more work on COP 26). Then I asked them to use LexTutor Concordancer with the BNC Spoken and Written and we noticed the  different  patterns and meanings,  related to sociopolitical or economic climate…). They participated a lot and wrote many comments in the chat :yahoo:

                                                                                                                              b) As the postgrads had been working on English as a lingua franca, and had read an article by Jennifer Jenkins “ELF at the Gate”, I asked them to copy and paste this article and then use the search tool in Webcorp with two words, ‘English’ and ‘varieties’. The point of this activitiy was to help them focus on the wide array of labels in English language teaching and discuss how useful (or useless) they can be for learners of English. I was surprised at how unenthusiastic they were: true, the computers and the connection were very slow and a lot of time was wasted trying to fix technical problems, but the activity itself I think left them rather cold. When I asked them to check the word ‘English’ on the Guardian platform, they seemed again rather uninterested in the different patterns and  meanings associated with English across news articles.

                                                                                                                              David’s remark about students’ lack of interest in corpora seems very true in this second case. :-(   I am also aware that they may just have been fed up with the ELF topic though it is very relevant to all of them as they are studying International Relations in English  in an Italian University and communicating with their classmates from other countries (France, Hungary, Turkey, Ghana etc.) in English… The very positive response of the first group felt in comparison an absolute boost :yahoo:

                                                                                                                              2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom? 

                                                                                                                              I think that Flax and Wordcloud are very interesting tools with lots of potential especially for the students who need to polish their writing for their written assignments. I’d like to have more insights into Wordcloud if possible :mail:

                                                                                                                            • #35276
                                                                                                                              Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                                                                              Keymaster
                                                                                                                                  @anastasios

                                                                                                                                  Hello @pennar Thank you for your post; it was really interesting to read about the differences between the two cohorts. I won’t make any comments with regard to the UG group as it sounded like you have used LexTutor before and that the task matched their linguistic needs i.e. UG students’ need for vocabulary development. I am interested in the experience of the PG group. Even though you mentioned internet connection was an issue (by the way, very brave of you to do this online), I was wondering how the students perceived the task or questions e.g. Were the words ‘English’ or ‘varieties’ perhaps too easy for them to study? I wasn’t so sure what you meant by ‘useful’ when you described the aim of the activity – ‘wide array of labels in English language teaching and discuss how useful (or useless) they can be for learners of English’. For example, I used the text you mentioned in WebCorp and identified the following terms: expanding circle, lingua franca, ELF varieties, ELF researchers, non-native speakers. What kind of comments could the students make in terms of the usefulness of these terms?

                                                                                                                                • #35323
                                                                                                                                  Cristina Pennarola
                                                                                                                                  Participant
                                                                                                                                      @pennar

                                                                                                                                      Thanks a lot @anastasios for your comments and suggestions. I think that maybe the article you’ve referred to is different from the one I used in class (text file attached). You may notice how many labels are attached to English across the 80 concordance lines  (e.g., Standard British English, World Standard English, American English, East Asian English, German English, Korean English,  International English (IE), NS English, Inner circle English, Academic English, etc. etc). These new’ Englishes’ are by no means clear-cut or  acknowledged by all scholars (as argued by Jennifer Jenkins).   As for varieties they’re far fewer  (ELF  varieties, NS varieties, NS standard varieties, NNS varieties) but  (at least to my mind) they encourage  interesting questions: what’s the difference between ELF varieties and NNS varieties? where do we draw the line between NS varieties and NS standard varieties?). Additionally there was some confusion over variety and variant. Looking back on the activities and readings in this and the next unit, I think that in my activity I was more focused on content than on language patterns. I wanted to encourage discussion, but failed to raise their interest :-(

                                                                                                                                      Attachments:
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                                                                                                                                    • #35337
                                                                                                                                      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                                                                                                                      Keymaster
                                                                                                                                          @anastasios

                                                                                                                                          Thank you @pennar Yes, you seemed to have focussed on the content, which is valid of course, but it needs to be done with more targeted questions. For example, we can ask students to compare concordance lines of ‘NS varieties’, ‘NNS variates’ and ‘ELF variates’ and identify words to the right or left context that show the writer’s positive or negative attitude. What kind of verbs or adjectives does the writer use to talk about these three terms? For example, I found ‘describe’, ‘existence’, ‘advocate teaching’, ‘argue in favour of’ and ‘potential variants’ to the right of ELF varieties. The topic that comes out from this mini qualitative examination is that ELF varieties is something that needs to be described and examined especially in terms of variation in order to make an argument for teaching it to learners. This is just an example of how concordancing can be used to examine attitude, but obviously if the focus is more on understanding the arguments in the text, then WebCorp might not be the right task. Hopefully, you will get some more ideas from the Unit 2 and 3 readings and corpus search techniques.

                                                                                                                                        • #38361
                                                                                                                                          Samuel Pealing
                                                                                                                                          Participant
                                                                                                                                              @sampea

                                                                                                                                              I am a little embarrassed to be starting this course so late, but we haven’t started our winter break here in Taiwan yet and it’s been a bit of a busy time! I have really enjoyed this first unit, and it has opened my eyes a little to how simple and accessible corpus study can be made.

                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                              1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

                                                                                                                                              This would be realistic and I have done corpus work with students before but not this directed. I wouldn’t face any technical limitations because with enough planning, I could book a computer room.

                                                                                                                                              2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

                                                                                                                                              Something I hadn’t thought about was going from wordcloud to webcorp to flax. I tend to only use flax, but I really like the idea of working up to flax by using simpler and tools like wordcloud and webcorp.

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