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    • #47602
      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
      Keymaster
          @anastasios

          Please share your thoughts below on the following two questions…oh, and just one thing. David isn’t particularly precious about his own teaching, so if there are things you felt could have been done differently or better, we’re happy to hear them ?

          1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

          2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

        • #49800
          Prisila Mlingi
          Participant
              @prisila

              It would be very realistic for me to carry out such activities in my context with my students. I do not anticipate any technical limitations as we have a decent allocation resources in my institution. However, for me to convince my students that corpus tools are of any value to them and their academic writing, I will have to prove how they can practically apply the tools with success.

              I think I can do this by creating separate worksheets with specific tasks as David did in the demonstration video. In addition I will have to provide explicit guidance on how to complete the tasks using the corpus tools.

              • #49811
                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                Keymaster
                    @anastasios

                    Thank you for sharing @prisila You touched upon a very important aspect, that of convincing the learners of the validity, usefulness and practicality of the tools. I think you might find Sripicharn (2010) from this week’s recommended reading particularly relevant.

                • #49975
                  Iain Newman
                  Participant
                      @inewman

                      1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

                      I find the examples in the videos would be welcome in most of classrooms, especially with the Pre-Masters students. The Foundation course students might struggle initially, but if it were scaffolded and monitored accordingly that would be fine. Most classrooms are fine with tech and students have own devices, but should there be an influx of users would it slow down or even crash these sits? In that case, the teacher should have a print out of concordance list ready to use in case.

                      2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

                      I found the programmes used in videos 2 and 3 really interesting, especially when used with teacher’s own worksheet to navigate the activity, but it would be advisable for it to lead to some independent use of Webcorp and Flax.

                      I didn’t particulary think the WordCloud site was the best one to use. The font (serif) would be inaccessible to some students and I think there must be a better layout to the one we saw.

                      • #50011
                        Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                        Keymaster
                            @anastasios

                            Thanks for sharing your thoughts @inewman You raised some very interesting points such as having a plan B when technology fails us, embedding the use of tools in various lessons stages, and the accessibility of the visuals (colours, font types and sizes). Regarding your question, I don’t think we ever had issues with the number of students accessing the tool as the same time; these are websites and are designed to handle large numbers of users. But, of course, yes they are down occasionally like any other technology we might use in a lesson.

                        • #50125
                          Jayn Kilbon
                          Participant
                              @jk

                              1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

                              For some groups of students, I can see these type of activities working really well. For example, with pre-sessional students or M-level students who tend to be quite focused and keen to try out new things. However, sometimes, I teach classes of 18 students, most of whom are not very technically literate and who also often find it difficult to stay focused in class. In this situation, the first few times the tools were used could be quite challenging, both for the students and the tutor.

                              2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

                              I like the idea of giving students worksheets to help them to investigate texts in Flax.

                              • #50190
                                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                Keymaster
                                    @anastasios

                                    Thank you for sharing your reflections @jk I agree with you. Postgraduate students tend to be more self-motivated and goal-oriented compared to undergraduates or foundation students. Is there anything in particular you would do to scaffold such tools and make their introduction less challenging?

                                • #50152
                                  Siti Asmiyah
                                  Participant
                                      @siti-asmiyah

                                      1) Given the context you teach in, how realistic would it be for you to do similar activities with your students? Are there any technical limitations and how could you adapt to them?

                                      It is realistic to use similar activities with my students as the platform seems to be easy to use. In particular, that use of Flax I think will really help students in the first year here in my Indonesian EFL context to really understand how words are organized in English (that is to say what possible combination students can use). For any technical limitation I think there may be not too challenging as long as the application/website is free. If it is possible to use it in a mobile phone mode, probably that will be easier for the students as there can be students who do not have computer to bring to class.

                                      2) Watching the lesson, are there any tips or ideas you’ve learnt that you feel you could use in your own classroom?

                                      I like the idea of the scaffoldings activities using staged tasks.

                                      • #50194
                                        Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                        Keymaster
                                            @anastasios

                                            Great ideas @siti-asmiyah – thank you for sharing them with us. FLAX is free and it has a student-friendly interface. And like you said, mobile phones and tablets are an alternative of course, but they also come with their own limitations e.g. software installation, screen size, navigation between tabs, etc.

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