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    • #47637
      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
      Keymaster
          @anastasios
          • What did you discover when using the tool? (you can report any findings from your searches)
          • How easy did you find the tool?
          • How would you use the tool (course/materials development, hands-on tasks in class, self-access for students, etc.) and why?
        • #51798
          Jayn Kilbon
          Participant
              @jk

              I looked at the wordlist function which was easy to use after watching the video in the about section. At first I wasn’t sure how I would use the word lists but I ended up comparing the noun wordlists for the BASE and BAWE corpus for physical science subjects. By then looking at the associated concordance lines, it highlighted some differences in the precision of language used beteween the spoken and written corpus. For example, thing and bit were in the top 5 of the wordlist in BASE whereas the wordlist for BASE had words like value and data in the top 5. This might have been useful to look at when I taught STEM PhD students who tended to script their departmental presentations using the same language that they would to write an academic article.

              However, one thing that I found a little frustrating was that I couldn’t work out how to filter the BASE corpus by discipline and then also filter by lecture or seminar. Similarly in the BAWE corpus wordlist, it seemed to be possible to filter by discipline or by essays but not to apply both. I’m not sure if I was overlooing something.

              • #51849
                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                Keymaster
                    @anastasios

                    Hello @jk thank you for sharing your examination of nouns in the two corpora. I agree with you – it’s very important to raise the students’ awareness of the features of academic presentations; they are an academic genre but at the same time they belong to the spoken register and they have several differences from academic prose e.g. sentence length, syntactic complexity, lexical density, etc. Regarding the Wordlist tool, you haven’t overlooked anything. Unfortunately, the free version of Sketch Engine only allows very limited filters i.e. lectures vs seminars and the broad disciplinary groups. However, if you have access via your institution, you can access the full features and select disciplines (as shown in the attached screenshot). I am not sure how many UK institutions opted in to continue access to SE for their staff and students past the end of the ELEXIS-funded programme. You can check by clicking Institutional login here https://auth.sketchengine.eu/#login , and then typing the name of your organisation to see if you have institutional access.

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                • #51826
                  Paula Acejo Cantero
                  Participant
                      @powla

                      I tried the wordlist functionality and found it quite useful, especially the ability to specify the POS and filter by domain. I missed this function for multiwords, then I discovered that ngram is the functionality for that. However,  I was a little disappoimted by the  results,  it included too many articles or stopwords that are not necessarily important I was hoping to get a list of most frequent collocations, such as business case and not the business of etc. I also tried to look for ngramz containing brain in BAwe and BASE and did not get any resukt other than thr human brain.. My conclusion is that it is better to use  con ordancs or word skettch to find collocations such as brain drain…or maybe I did not use this feature well…I missed something. Also ngrams can take long to be generated….

                    • #51852
                      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                      Keymaster
                          @anastasios

                          Hello @powla thank you for post! Excellent observations about the resutls. The wordlist and n-gram functions are using frequency only and no other statistical measures. For this reason, our results will include many functions words e.g. determiners, prepositions, primary verbs, pronouns, etc. regardless of the corpus and the language variety/register it represents. So, wordlist and n-grams are a good starting point to help you prioritise vocabulary and lexical bundles, but if you are interested in collocations of content words e.g. brain, business, etc., then Word Sketch is better. Finally, yes that’s correct. n-grams can take longer to generate because essentially we are checking the entire corpus, as opposed to searching for one item in Concordance or Word Sketch.

                           

                        • #52633
                          Prisila Mlingi
                          Participant
                              @prisila

                              I watched the video and also read the instructions. I spent almost 1 hour struggling with both the N-gram and word list functions but I was not successful :-( :cry:

                              • #52634
                                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                Keymaster
                                    @anastasios

                                    Hello @prisila thank you for sharing your thoughts. I am happy to help. Would you like us to focus on one tool as the task suggested and discuss what you struggled with? It might also be a good idea to focus on the three questions as opposed to trying to understand every single aspect of the interface.

                                • #52865
                                  Siti Asmiyah
                                  Participant
                                      @siti-asmiyah

                                      What did you discover when using the tool? (you can report any findings from your searches)

                                      The N-gram is about the possible combination of the words, that is the probability of what word will come next to a certain word. The combination can be two to six words in rows.

                                      The word list provides items we can select based on the part of speech. It also can be extended to word starting with, ending or containing. So we can limit our selection. It can also be extended to thesaurus, concordance and word sketch. We can also limit what to include and exclude and enable more focused selection.

                                      How easy did you find the tool?

                                      I think both are easy. I just need to get used to both and practice more often.

                                      How would you use the tool (course/materials development, hands-on tasks in class, self-access for students, etc.) and why?

                                      I will probably use the tool for beginner students to learn about how the words and parts of speech may collocate. Beginner students in my Indonesian context of EFL need more models and inputs related to how they can use words and what combinations are acceptable. I may give an instruction; for example, find what words start with ‘interesting’ and what words go after that word. Try to use the word and combination in your own sentence.

                                    • #52874
                                      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                      Keymaster
                                          @anastasios

                                          Thanks for this lovely idea @siti-asmiyah The n-gram tool will definitely help learners of lower language levels by providing them with those ready (semi-)fixed lexical chunks, especially if they are searching for a specific word to be included in the lexical chunk. Did you happen to explore the Key n-grams feature by the way?

                                          • #52946
                                            Siti Asmiyah
                                            Participant
                                                @siti-asmiyah

                                                I hadn’t. Then I tried after you asked. But I do not understand the option of ‘from this list’. I have tried to use the feature by having the list, separating the words with comma. It did not work. Then, I removed the coma, still it did not work. Then, I tried to list very general words: teaching, learning (I tried both with comma and without comma), still, it did not work.

                                            • #52960
                                              Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                              Keymaster
                                                  @anastasios

                                                  Thank you for this @siti-asmiyah The ‘From this list‘ option allows you to search for a specific n-gram in order to check its frequency. That means you need to type a phrase, not just a word (I must admit the instruction ‘one word per line’ is a little misleading). In addition, you need to ensure that the n-gram size you selected matches what you want to find out. For an example see the screenshot I have attached. Hope this helps.

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