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    • #32259
      David Read
      Keymaster
        @david

        If you have any feedback or comments at the end of the first unit, we’d appreciate them. These can be comments about the content itself or about the site and the ease of use. However, please don’t feel under obligation to add anything here if time doesn’t permit.

      • #33990
        Karl Hannay
        Participant
          @karl-hannay

          I found the readings especially helpful at understanding the main use of corpus linguistics in the classroom. This was particularly the case with the last two readings. When I get the time, I will look at them again in more detail.

        • #34002
          Ana Vucicevic
          Participant
            @ana93

            I have to say that Flax is such a discovery for me! You gave me a lot of ideas for research within the context of English for Specific Academic Purposes. I can exactly visualise the uses in the classroom I observed for almost a year.

            • #34283
              Anastasios Asimakopoulos
              Keymaster
                @anastasios

                Glad to hear you felt inspired by the materials so far @ana93 :)

              • #34373
                Vera Duncanson
                Participant
                  @vera-t

                  I agree that Flax is a useful tool and easy to incorporate into any EAP lesson. I have already familiarised my students with the flax website and am planning to refer to it most lessons so students can get ideas how they can use this tool independently.

              • #34371
                Vera Duncanson
                Participant
                  @vera-t

                  The first reading was a real eyeopener. Never thought that learner corpus data existed. Thinking about it, learner corpus should inform EAP materials and I’m sure it does to some extent, but apparently, not enough – or at least that was the situation in 2007 when the article was written. I’m curious if/how this has changed – I’ll be looking out for this in the course books I’m using with my ss. This article has made me aware that it is important to choose EAP materials that are informed by learner corpus data.

                  • #34377
                    Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                    Keymaster
                      @anastasios

                      Hi @vera-t. Indeed there are several learner corpora, both general English such as the Trinity Lancaster Corpus and specialised corpora like the British Academic Written English corpus (BAWE) and the British Academic Spoken English corpus (BASE), both accessible via SketchEngine for free. We will focus on BAWE in this course, but there are also American corpora such as the Michigan Corpus of Upper Level Student Papers (MICUSP) and the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE). So, there are plenty of student writing samples that you can use in your EAP lessons.

                  • #34406
                    Babruwan Kore
                    Participant
                      @babruwan

                      Dear Tutors,

                      I had an excellent time exploring these tools. I especially liked A Guide to Flax and Webcrop and the article on ‘How can we prepare learners for using corpora?’.

                      The article by Sripicharn, P.  is an excellent. I was worried about wasting teaching time in class but the article has helped me find ways to use a corpus. The suggestion of preparing learners to use a corpus over a period of time is really useful. This can save teaching time and at the same time can boost learners’ confidence.

                      Thank you very much for making this useful content available.

                      Babruwan Kore

                      • #34445
                        Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                        Keymaster
                          @anastasios

                          Hello @babruwan – we are pleased to hear you found the article useful. I personally find the ‘do’s and don’ts’ list very helpful!

                      • #34415
                        Karl Hannay
                        Participant
                          @karl-hannay

                          I still don’t understand the use of determining frequency of words in a student’s text? Is this to determine its coherency?

                          • #34446
                            Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                            Keymaster
                              @anastasios

                              Hello @karl-hannay That’s a very good question. Frequency is connected to lexical cohesion and how it helps construct a particular topic in a text. For example, I just read an article on bbc.co.uk and the ten most frequent content words were: fossil (17), fuel (14), climate (9), emissions (7), companies (7), cop26 (6), global (6), oil (6), gas (6) and delegates (5). Repetition of these key words is vital for coherence and cohesion, and so are their collocates e.g. fossil fuels, fuel companies, fuel lobbyists, fuel industry, climate change, climate crisis, to name a few. In addition, identifying these in student texts can help them direct their attention to key vocabulary and focus on the lexico-grammatical accuracy of these words/phrases.

                          • #34431
                            Judith Gorham
                            Participant
                              @judith-gorham

                              The readings are very useful.  It was refreshing to see the discussion about Successful Users of English rather than native speaker-informed corpora in the O’Keefe et al. Today it seems increasingly irrelevant and un-useful to make the distinction between NS and NNS, and surely impossible when creating a corpus, as well as ideologically suspect.

                              • #34450
                                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                Keymaster
                                  @anastasios

                                  I couldn’t agree with you more @judith-gorham! The distinction is still rather problematic. I remember I was reading a research article a few months ago, about the construction of a discipline-specific vocabulary list. The researchers built a corpus of discipline-specific research articles written by ‘native speakers’. However, their methodology did not cover the criteria used to determine the ‘nativeness’ of the author(s) of the research articles – was it the author’s ‘English-looking/sounding name’, the location of the university they were affiliated with, or perhaps both? Or what did they do with articles written by pairs or groups of researchers? Or, why would ‘nativeness’ matter for a genre like research articles that have been through multiple stages of editing and proofreading before publication? So many questions we could ask…

                              • #35227
                                Cristina Pennarola
                                Participant
                                  @pennar

                                  Many thanks for this very practical introduction to how to use corpus tools in the classroom! :good: I’ve found both the activities and the readings invaluable. Thank you also to my fellow participants as I get better insights and new ideas from your comments :bye:

                                • #35274
                                  Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                                  Keymaster
                                    @anastasios

                                    Thank you @pennar We’re glad to hear your positive feedback!

                                  • #37495
                                    egp21hq
                                    Participant
                                      @egp21hq

                                      Thanks a lot for the sharing. My students and I gained new tools to improve our learning in English.

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