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    • #13889
      Manuel Flores Lasarte
      Moderator
          @manuel

          Now share the knowledge! You can attach the document you created to your post or copy and paste it in.

          Make sure you read you coursemates’ posts and reply with any comments you have about the articles they chose.

        • #58429
          Peter Wilson
          Participant
              @peterw

              The article
              What is the article?
              Try this it works! Error correction for speaking

              What is the article about?
              whether error correction for speaking actually has any effect

              docs.google.com/document/d/1F0OrcIJmEAJ_7B-cjiXgaKzN2HBNCYTiubyafBzCbFo/edit

              http://malingual.blogspot.com/

               

              Two things you found interesting (or surprising) in the article:
              -The evidence showing error correction of speaking IS useful and worthwhile

              – The research showing explicit is more useful than implicit error correction

              Applying your findings
              How could it be relevant/applicable to your own teaching context?
              EC works, students know this and want more of it, particularly explicit corrections with explanations. More class time should be given over to EC, form-focused instruction, feedback on production, working with what students are saying and helping them to say it better.

              How could the topic of the article be exploited in P2, T3?
              It traces the history of theories of error correction from audiolinguism to the present so includes different perspectives to write about. It debates some key theories using useful key terminology e.g. implicit (recasting) vs. explicit metalinguistic feedback.

               

              :mail:

              • #59052
                Nicholas Northall
                Moderator
                    @nick-northall

                    Hi Peter,

                    Thanks for sharing this. Strangely I know the author very, very well!

                    I must admit that I was drawn to Chris’ section on different terminologies: i.e. those teachers use and those researchers use. I think you’ll find that researches make up a lot of new terms (to describe old processes, etc) in an effort to be perhaps say something they believe is new!

                    Chris makes some very good points about EC with reference to empirical data. It is interesting that the canard of EC being useless started back in the late 80’s still holds sway. From a personal point of view, I feel that most teachers do include some error correction, but most should do more – perhaps this is due to a lack of effort (EC can be difficult) or not knowing what to correct (new teachers). Chris makes a good point at the end of his blog about finding out from learners if they want to be corrected. Personally, I don’t like that much correction as it annoys me when I’m trying to say something.

                    If you think about DM1, P2, T3… imagine a question came up; something like ‘ What reasons are there for teachers to not correct their learners?’ What could you say…

                    Cheers,

                    Nick

                • #58430
                  Peter Wilson
                  Participant
                      @peterw
                    • #58898
                      Robert Dailey
                      Participant
                          @robertd

                          https://academic.oup.com/eltj/article/74/2/198/5805512

                          The article I have chosen has the simple title of Grammar and it is a very short investigation – only two and a half pages – into the history of the word. The article provides some brief descriptions of different types of grammar, such as: descriptive, prescriptive, pedagogical, transformational, functional, and it asserts that in ELT there seems to be general agreement about what makes up the grammar of English. The article finishes with a number of thought-provoking questions about the choice and treatment of grammar items in ELT today.

                          One thing I found interesting was the premise that this choice and treatment of grammar items is up for debate, and I find it interesting especially because my perception is that the type of grammar taught (e.g. relative clauses at pre-int level etc.) is fairly universal across course books and materials. Another thing I found interesting was the brief description of the differences between constitutive grammar and communicative grammar: something I had not read about before.

                           

                           

                           

                          • #59057
                            Nicholas Northall
                            Moderator
                                @nick-northall

                                Hi Robert,

                                Thanks for sharing this.

                                I hadn’t read about constitutive grammar and communicative grammar before either – although I had heard the latter mentioned. It would be interesting to know more about why course books decide to include the grammar they do, and why structures are always presented in the same order (more or less) e.g. present simple, past simple, present continuous, etc. I did know what recent research using corpora has began to challenge this. I wonder if this will (already has) created course books which include, as the author states language the ‘learners need to know’.

                                You may also find this very informative and engaging talk by Michael Swan worth watching.

                                Cheers,

                                Nick

                            • #59628
                              Erica
                              Participant
                                  @erica

                                  https://doi-org.sheffield.idm.oclc.org/10.1093/elt/ccs020

                                  What is the article?
                                  Task repetition in ELT

                                  What is the article about?
                                  It looks at (oral) task repetition from a different prospective and explains its pedagogical benefits.

                                  Two things you found interesting (or surprising) in the article:
                                  – “Repetition of the same or similar tasks is the repetition of familiar form and content. Learners might thus be able to build upon what they have already done in order to ‘buy time’ not only to do mental work on what they are about to communicate but also to access and (re)formulate words and grammatical structures more efficiently, effectively, and accurately”.
                                  – “In task repetition, the first performance of the task is regarded as preparation for (or a pre-task activity before) further performances”. This assumption may encourage teachers to think about ways in which tasks might be linked within lessons to provide learners with opportunities to work repeatedly with similar linguistic content.

                                  How could it be relevant/applicable to your own teaching context?

                                  – Recycle language and tasks when reviewing / doing formative assessment.
                                  – Reflect on the type of feedback to give after a task is done for the first time bearing in mind that learners need time to process the input and that “L2 learners cannot focus on both meaning and form simultaneously”.

                                  How could the topic of the article be exploited in P2, T3?
                                  It is useful to speculate on the purposes, advantages and disadvantages of the tasks we use in the classroom. It is also important to consider different points of view, e.g. the students: more time to digest language, “second chance” to do something better (weaker students) / stronger students may work on accuracy rather than fluency, etc.. ; the teacher, recycling is timesaving, being familiar with the format may positively affect reliability (assessment), etc.

                                  • #59815
                                    Nicholas Northall
                                    Moderator
                                        @nick-northall

                                        Hi Erica,

                                        Thanks for sharing this.

                                        Task repetition is something that I always tell my pre-service teachers (e.g. on CELTA) to do as it  helps learners develop both fluency and accuracy, helps them to gain confidence (in a speaking task) and gives them the opportunity to focus on both meaning and form.  It also allows, as you mention Erica, the learners to reflect on feedback given by the teacher, a peer or themselves – thus improving their output. I guess in some ways a process approach to completing a task.

                                        You make some solid points about how this article could be exploited in Paper 2. I guess a question you could come up against would be something like ‘what reasons are there for teachers to not recycle language’?

                                        Cheers,

                                        Nick

                                    • #59749
                                      Gajinder Kaur
                                      Participant
                                          @gk

                                          What is the article?
                                          TEACHING UNPLUGGED : DOGME IN ELT

                                          What is the article about?
                                          It’s actually an entire book by Scott Thornbury and Luke Meddings, which talks about a meta-method, an alternate approach or a teaching movement set up by ELT-teachers in ELT that is materials light, conversation driven and focuses on emergent language.
                                          The name ‘dogme’ is derived from Dogme 95- a filmmaking movement by Danish cinema-makers who were disaffected by tech-tricks and fantastical elements, and placed their reliance on the actual, relevant narrative instead.

                                          Two things you found interesting (or surprising) in the article:
                                          1) The use of 4 key resources for unplugged learning:
                                          learners/ paper/ language/ place.
                                          This challenges the very hegemony of course books and materials, brings in to relevance home-grown, local and diverse resources, as opposed to thrusting post-colonial white-capitalist BANA contexts on multilinguistic/ multicultural learners.
                                          2) It even causes a paradigm shift from techno-fundamentalism to a back-to-basics approach, where the student and teacher are enough unto themselves for language to emerge and learning to take place, as in a pre-method state of grace.

                                          How could it be relevant/applicable to your own teaching context?
                                          As tempting as this nouveau-radical approach might sound, to abandon the safety net of scaffoldings and pre-prepared lesson plans is quite intimidating.
                                          However, as many ELT teachers globally have pointed out, like Lisa Dold in her article Dogme: A Teacher’s View; here : https://ihworld.com/ih-journal/issues/issue-34/dogme-a-teacher-s-view/
                                          , Dogme need not be a whole class facilitation, but we as teachers can develop a dogme mindset and grab emergent dogme moments in class as and when they arise. This is a more applicable and practical approach for me in an institutional setting, where doing away with a prescribed lesson plan means death of my career altogether.
                                          So what I am consciously doing and endeavouring to do is preplan which aspects of the lesson I will/can let go off, especially in speaking skills for instance, in a particular task, and use the dogme approach there, within the context of the lesson.
                                          I need more time to practise this before  I can actually say it was a successful operation.

                                          How could the topic of the article be exploited in P2, T3?

                                          It is a relatively new concept in ELT, made legit only in 2000, but has garnered a massive fan following. It could be cited as a radical shift from the over and sometimes tiresomely rigid and cosmetic methodologies to the simplistic choice that ELT teachers could make use of to get the language and learning going. However, as with everything else, there are clearly some aspects that need to be dealt with before adopting it as a first choice. So, says Thornbury, the best approach would be to adapt it instead. By giving practical teaching steps and approaches, it could be cited in the task as a preferred method of choice.

                                        • #59824
                                          Nicholas Northall
                                          Moderator
                                              @nick-northall

                                              Hi Gajinder,

                                              Thanks for sharing your research into Dogme here. You may remember that Peter posted in the Unit 11 forum about Dogme to which I shared a couple of my thoughts about it. Saying this, I think Dogme in ELT is worth reading – as are various articles the authors have published on it. For me, although I do have my scepticisms, the fact that it can be used in most (all) contexts is, as you rightly mention Gajinder, a way to focus on the actual learners in the classroom and what is useful/relevant to them rather than to the generic learner by using a coursebook designed for a (usually) western audience.

                                              The article you share by Lisa Dold is also worth a read. I think she makes some good points about integrating Dogme into our lessons, which I think most of us do anyway (perhaps without being told we’re doing ‘dogme’) when we work with our learners’ emergent language. Basically putting the learner at the centre of the learning where they should be.

                                              Cheers,

                                              Nick

                                               

                                            • #59825
                                              Nicholas Northall
                                              Moderator
                                                  @nick-northall

                                                  Hi All,

                                                  Thanks for sharing your research here. I have responded to each poster with individual comments. Please do continue to post. And do feel free to comment on each other’s posts.

                                                  Best wishes,

                                                  Nick

                                                • #60593
                                                  Amira Madkour
                                                  Participant
                                                      @amy-madkr

                                                      The article argues that teachers should not solely focus on skimming and scanning when teaching reading. It states that the two skills are already known to learners from L1. Yet in order for them to transfer to L2 reading texts, learners need to have a threshold of linguistic competence.

                                                      The article states that unless teachers integrate skimming and scanning with other linguistic features like lexical and grammatical and discourse features, it would be a waste of time and resources.

                                                      Two things you found interesting (or surprising) in the article:

                                                      Skimming and scanning should not be the only focus when teaching reading. The other point I already know but it was good to remind myself with the accurate figure. Researchers suggest that familiarity with 95% or more of the words in a text is the cut-off point to navigate through a text and transfer L1 reading skills to L2 reading texts.

                                                       

                                                       

                                                      • #60747
                                                        Nicholas Northall
                                                        Moderator
                                                            @nick-northall

                                                            Hi Amira,

                                                            Thanks for sharing your ideas here. However, I couldn’t access your article!

                                                            Yes, there is a lot of debate about teaching learners reading subskills and strategies to be able to apply these subskills. I totally agree that learners competent readers in their L1 struggle to read in the TL due to a lack of language (namely vocabulary) rather than not being able to apply reading subskills. That’s why I guess we need to build their language resources as well as teach them reading strategies they can employ to bypass their lack of vocabulary.

                                                            And yes, I think it is around 95% lexical coverage (Schmidt, I believe) to be able to fully work with a text.

                                                            Cheers,

                                                            Nick

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