Viewing 10 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #2742
      Nicholas Northall
      Moderator
          @nick-northall
          • Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.
          • Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?
          • Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?
        • #50134
          Robert Dailey
          Participant
              @robertd

              Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

              My preferred technique is to use texts, especially newspapers, so learners can see the lexis in context. Texts offers lots of opportunities for subsequent speaking and writing activities. I also like to use puzzles and games like crosswords basically because my students tend to like them.

              This said, it´s great when language emerges during role plays and during these tasks I can see that students really want to know what lexis they need to, for example, order a meal in a restaurant.

              Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

              I work in-company with business professionals and, as just mentioned, seeing what language emerges and what is missing/ problematic in a role play like a job interview, using a TBL (strong) framework, is almost always very engaging for the students.

              Realia is great for teaching concrete, tangible vocabulary: food, etc., and I recently used mime when introducing some verbs about ways of moving (e.g. trudge, stagger, strut etc.) to a C1 group.

              Sometimes the most effective way to deal with more abstract vocabulary is via translation. With less abstract vocabulary this can also save a lot of time!

              Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

              Describe and draw activities are I think very effective across levels. I´ve only used them with adults, but I imagine they would be effective with YLs as well (although perhaps not young children). The same probably applies to word maps (Harmer, p.266) and “back to the board” activities.

              I recently used a board game with a C! group to introduce phrasal verbs and idioms and this worked very well in the sense that all of the learners were engaged. I think board games are also effective at most levels and with most ages.

              • #50202
                Nicholas Northall
                Moderator
                    @nick-northall

                    Hi Robert,

                    Thanks for sharing.

                    You make a good point about the techniques you use (i.e. crosswords and puzzles) because your students like them. Perhaps teachers choose texts and topics because they like them; not because their learners will like them! You also make a good point about working with emerging language giving the learners what they need and want.

                    You mention a range of techniques for presenting vocabulary. I don’t think I have ever really used realia – instead I tend to use google images (for concrete nouns and sometimes even verbs) but you have to be careful… I once tried to clarify ‘marina’ in the middle of a lesson but the images the search engine found did not indicate the meaning I wanted…

                    I also think you make a good point about translation – something that was out of fashion for a long time, but something which has definitely made a comeback over the last decade following the publication of this book.

                    I also like describe and draw which does work with YLs – although I haven’t’ taught any for about 15 years! I think that main thing is that we find something that our learners want to do and enjoy.

                    Cheers,

                    Nick

                     

                  • #50670
                    Gajinder Kaur
                    Participant
                        @gk

                        Hello!

                        I am very intrigued that you actually find time for board games in class. Sounds so much fun!

                        And so much potential there…

                    • #50135
                      Erica
                      Participant
                          @erica

                          1.Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                          I like teaching adjectives by presenting sets of opposites (good-bad, etc.) pictures when it’s possible because they can learn more words with little effort, the learn positive and negative connotations, it gives them more options to express themselves. Whenever it’s possible I work with pictures as they give students the “visual aid” to translate the words from their L1 to L2 allowing little confusion in the process (as long as the picture truly reflect the meaning of the new word).

                          At higher levels I like focusing on “forming opposites” through affixation (possible- impossible) or transforming words, e.g. from adjective to noun = (im)possible – possibility. Again, I believe it’s an effective way of enlarging learning vocabulary by focusing on the language without overloading students with the meaning of the new words. In other words, the challenging part is to work on affixes and recognise the word class of the words as the meaning of the “new formed words” is easily deducible.

                          I also love word maps as they allow students to organise their thoughts in a visual way. I tend to use this technique at any level.

                          2.Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                          Matching words with pictures (or suing realia) when the vocabulary is tangible (e.g., colours, animals, food, etc.) or it expresses simple concept (simple adjectives for feelings, happy, etc.; simple verbs: write, listen, etc.). A picture may be enough to teach the meaning. Arguably, you could present this type of vocabulary “on its own” without for example using a simple text (written or recorded) to contextualise it. A good lead-in may suffice (“How are you feeling today?”) to establish the context of the lesson (and of the vocab); then present and teach the lexis using pictures. after that, practise/ use / play with the new vocabulary through other activities (role plays, writing poems, mime and guess the word, jumble up the words and then re-write them, Simon says, etc.).

                          Perhaps, more abstracts vocabulary needs a different way of presenting it in context (a text or a dialogue, either video or audio). However, you could still use matching exercises to teach meaning even if you may not use pictures here, but full definitions – even if I found pictures quite useful when teaching the meaning of some phrasal verbs or idioms).

                          3.Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                          Chants are more appropriate for young learners – probably at any level of English they may be studying at.

                          Generally speaking, games work well with all age groups. For example, I teach adults and we sometimes play BINGO to revise vocabulary (either with pictures or words on the bingo card) and they all seem to like it.

                          Other activities like word maps and describe and draw seem to work well at all age. However, if word maps work well at all levels as well, I wonder what the value of “describe and draw” may be at higher levels. For example, I use “describe and draw” with both beginner and elementary students to practise vocabulary related to objects and prepositions of place and /or describe people’s physical appearance. With pre-int, I use this activity to teach how to give instructions using imperatives and vocab associated with lines/shapes and again preposition of place (Student A has a grid with some numbered boxes. In each box there are some shapes or lines. The student tells the partner what and where to draw those forms. Student B listen and draw. Student B can ask questions but cannot see the original grid). Again, “describe and draw” works well. But I have never used it with students from B2 above as it seems to me that the language that may use to describe something is too advanced in relation to their drawing skills and/or “describe and draw” is too basic in relation to the vocabulary you teach the students at those high levels.

                           

                          • #50203
                            Nicholas Northall
                            Moderator
                                @nick-northall

                                Hi Erica,

                                Thanks for sharing.

                                You make some sound points about using different techniques depending on our learners (in the case you mention, their level in the TL) finding something they are able to do. You also mention a solid point about pictures actually meaning what they are supposed to mean  – also I guess our learners all having the same comprehension of what a picture means! Everyone perhaps has a slight different idea in their head for most ‘words’, so a picture although clear to you and most of the learners may represent something different to one or two learners. For example would all learners understand this image to mean ‘ghost’ (it is Halloween after all) or the second one?

                                I agree about your points about using pictures to teach vocabulary (especially more concrete nouns or ideas) as it is a very ‘usually’ easy way to do so. You could even ask learners to find the words themselves using a search engine.

                                I also agree with your comments about describe and draw. I too have used it to help learners practise prepositions of place (e.g. each learner draws a room they know and then describes it to their partner), but (I can’t remember) used it with learners over B2. I think for the points you make about the learners’ drawing skills and / or the vocabulary (perhaps abstract) they are attempting to draw.

                                Cheers,

                                Nick

                                 

                            • #50205
                              Nicholas Northall
                              Moderator
                                  @nick-northall

                                  Dear All,

                                  Thanks to Robert and Erica for your thoughtful and interesting contributions to this forum task. Please feel free to continue to read, and respond to, each other’s posts. Here is a summary of the main ideas to come out of the contributions that were made.

                                  A variety of different techniques and activities are used for introducing, practising and recycling vocabulary. The techniques that are chosen depend on a number of factors, including the type of lexical item, the level and age of the learners, learner needs and preferences and the purpose of the course (e.g. business English). When deciding on what technique to use, you may also like to consider the aim of the lesson as a whole, the purpose of the particular activity and practical considerations such as the mode of delivery, classroom organisation and the amount of time available.

                                  Particular techniques that were mentioned are:

                                  • describe and draw
                                  • translation
                                  • realia
                                  • visuals (pictures, drawings, photos)
                                  • synonyms/antonyms
                                  • matching (e.g. definitions with pictures)
                                  • categorising/classifying
                                  • word maps
                                  • games (e.g. bingo, crosswords)
                                  • mime

                                  Can anyone add any other techniques that you regularly use with your learners?

                                  Other key points to consider are:

                                  • The importance of learners’ needs and wants;
                                  • The importance of context (e.g. introducing vocabulary in a sentence or via a text, deducing meaning from context);
                                  • Focusing on chunks of language (e.g. collocations, idioms, formulaic expressions);
                                  • The need to record and use (both in and out of class) new language to aid retention;
                                  • Ensuring vocabulary learning is purposeful, meaningful and authentic.

                                  Feel free to add any further ideas or comments to this topic.

                                  Cheers,

                                  Nick

                                  • #50669
                                    Gajinder Kaur
                                    Participant
                                        @gk

                                        I also find recycling the vocabulary learnt in previous classes effective for learners, especially in school, for they might/tend to forget the new words if not compelled to use them.

                                      • #50845
                                        Nicholas Northall
                                        Moderator
                                            @nick-northall

                                            Hi Gajinder,

                                            Yes recycling vocabulary is essential. How do you do this?

                                            Cheers,

                                            Nick

                                        • #50467
                                          Aytaj Suleymanova
                                          Participant
                                              @aytajs93

                                              Hi everyone! Here are my thought on these questions:

                                              Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                                              For the presentation part building context is the most natural way. I like giving more agency to students when it comes to clarifying vocabulary. They can choose if they want to find the meaning, translation or just look up the images in the search engine. Whatever works best for them.

                                              Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                                              With my primary students games and more interactive ways of presenting lexis is more appropriate, in my opinion. Realia also gets the children’s attention really well.

                                              Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                                              I try to avoid translation as it then encourages the students to use their native language more often instead of using their English skills to explain something. Sometimes it can be useful but there are some international students in the class for whom that is not effective at all.

                                               

                                              • #50655
                                                Erica
                                                Participant
                                                    @erica

                                                    Hi Aytaj,

                                                    I’m revising some lexis terminology and I think I mixed up “cognate” and “false friends” when we checked each other’s homework during the last live session – I’m so sorry! However, Thornbury gives a clear definition of the two terms – I’ve just rewritten my own notes as well!

                                                    Have a nice day!

                                                    Erica

                                                  • #50658
                                                    Aytaj Suleymanova
                                                    Participant
                                                        @aytajs93

                                                        Hi Erica!

                                                        Thanks for your message. No worries, I did look up the word the next day so the confusion was avoided :)

                                                      • #50846
                                                        Nicholas Northall
                                                        Moderator
                                                            @nick-northall

                                                            Hi Aytaj,

                                                            I think you make some good points here. Firstly, context is key! I think not setting a clear context and retaining this throughout a lesson can cause all sorts of problems. Contexts are useful for not only teaching language but also skills. I also think your second point also touches on context but a different kind: e.g. the techniques and approaches we use very much depend on the context of our lessons – e.g. YLs compared with Business English. And I agree about translation, but even with mixed L1s, it is possible to use translation although it can be a lot trickier!

                                                            Cheers,

                                                            Nick

                                                        • #50494
                                                          Andrew Burke
                                                          Participant
                                                              @andrew

                                                              Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                                                              I try to teach in lexical sets and then try to exploit the new vocabulary as much as possible, this is often getting students to match definitions and then to put the new vocabulary into a sentence which they share with other students and the class. In addition, if the spelling is tricky or I have students struggling with spelling,  I will add some or the whole of the set to a spelling test. I try to return to the same vocabulary later in the term, this may be in a test or through noticing the vocabulary in, for example, readings we do. I guess the thought behind this is that exposure will help the vocabulary to become part of their language (I’m sure there’s a good term for this).

                                                              I’m a big fan of incidental language, if that’s the right term. So, if I find myself saying a phrasal verb or other unusual phrase in class I’ll write it down on the board. Then, if I ever repeat it, I’ll check the students now understand it. Hopefully, if they see vocabulary in use, they’ll understand it and appreciate it more.

                                                              I exploit vocabulary in readings in a similar way to the example in Unit 2.6

                                                              I encourage vocab books and show them my own English spelling and vocab books for words I struggle to spell or words that are new to me. That initially confuses them as they assume I know and can spell everything in English. Hopefully, if they can see even the teacher learns this way, they’ll think it’s a good technique.

                                                              Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                                                              Not sure I know much about this. But I can say that when I teach adverbs of frequency I get them to write the words on a scale to show their relationships with each other, which are more or less frequent. So, I guess I’m saying some word groups (lexical sets?) work well with visuals; hate, dislike, don’t mind, like, love is another example.

                                                              If ever anyone wants to borrow it, I created a great game of snakes and ladders, where students have to conjugate irregular verbs (not sure if this is classed as lexis or grammar but anyway….). What’s great about the game is that as they keep going down the snakes, they have to keep repeating the verbs so they learn them; rote learning I guess.

                                                              Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                                                              Again, not sure I have much to say. Obviously, difficulty and amount of vocab may change depending on level, help with spelling may be more or less relevant. I’ve never taught children, but I imagine a fun, colourful element helps. Sorry not able to contribute much to this one.

                                                              • #50847
                                                                Nicholas Northall
                                                                Moderator
                                                                    @nick-northall

                                                                    Hi Andrew,

                                                                    Thanks for sharing your ideas here. I also agree about incidental language and using it as a resource in the classroom. I like your idea about snakes and ladders – perhaps you could demonstrate in the next live session? I’d say conjugation of verbs is about grammar?

                                                                    Cheers,

                                                                    Nick

                                                                • #50511
                                                                  Peter Wilson
                                                                  Participant
                                                                      @peterw

                                                                      Hi all

                                                                      I agree with Robert and think using authentic texts like newspapers with higher level learners is a great idea as they are usually relevant, interesting and challenging. I like the idea of Andrew’s  Snakes & Ladders game :-) And it’s good to be reminded of activities – I haven’t played vocab bingo in ages so I’ll have to bring that one back. I think noting down and recycling incidental vocab is really important and something I should do more of. Last synchronous session Robert mentioned a class vocab box which sounded good. I used to do more of this when we had real whiteboards not IWBs.

                                                                      1) For lexis I like using matching cards, flashcards and slideshows for presentations, lots of lots of drilling (choral and individual – I might try the Boom game), I also like doing functional lexis lessons using cue card prompts building up to roleplays. I really liked all the activities in the Sheffield Reading text we did so I’ll be nicking all of those especially the re-telling the text from memory. I’ve tried this before as part of a dictogloss lessons I’ve done. I also love games e.g. Guess Who. Charades, Pictionary, Taboo, Name Five (like family fortunes) and Stop The Bus (categories beginning with a letter)

                                                                      2)  I guess beginners need pictures more and pre int up can cope with much more reading and matching to definitions. I think some words lend themselves to mimes and TPR e.g. cooking verbs, daily routine, present continuous phrases etc. Lexical chunks like phrasal verbs need more word based activities e.g. Taboo.

                                                                      Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)? I reckon everyone loves a game now and again and adult beginners need choral drilling – it can be dry but you can make it fun as well.

                                                                       

                                                                      :good:

                                                                      • #50514
                                                                        Andrew Burke
                                                                        Participant
                                                                            @andrew

                                                                            Yes, incidental, not accidental, thanks Peter.

                                                                            Andrew

                                                                          • #50848
                                                                            Nicholas Northall
                                                                            Moderator
                                                                                @nick-northall

                                                                                Hi Peter,

                                                                                I’m glad you liked the text about Sheffield – it’s based on a lesson I’ve used as part of a demo lesson with CELTA trainees. Perhaps you could do one for Manchester?

                                                                                I think the key points you make here are having variety in the activities and tasks we do; not so much that the learners don’t have any routine, but enough so they don’t get bored.

                                                                                Cheers,
                                                                                Nick

                                                                            • #50635
                                                                              Amira Madkour
                                                                              Participant
                                                                                  @amy-madkr

                                                                                  Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                                                                                  I prefer using newspaper, authentic texts.

                                                                                  Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                                                                                  To present new lexis, mind mapping for brainstorming, power point  presentations to present an idea and also reading/picture cards. Keeping posters on Padlet is very useful. To practice or recap, there are so many digital tools; Khahoot,  Mamboed, Quizlets

                                                                                  Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                                                                                  Most adults learners like to see visual representations of the lexical set, I usually use PPT for that. They also like to practice in pairs or in groups.

                                                                                  • #50849
                                                                                    Nicholas Northall
                                                                                    Moderator
                                                                                        @nick-northall

                                                                                        Hi Amira,

                                                                                        Thanks for posting. Using authentic texts is a great way to engage learners, but we have to be careful that the texts we use aren’t too difficult or not scaffolded enough to support their learning. With careful planning they can be used with very low level learners.  I also agree about Lexical Sets – Andrew also makes this comments – how do you use PPT here?

                                                                                        Cheers,
                                                                                        Nick

                                                                                    • #50668
                                                                                      Gajinder Kaur
                                                                                      Participant
                                                                                          @gk

                                                                                          Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                                                                                          Since I teach prescribed lesson plans, we usually have a pre-teach vocab section before reading. I cruise through this and ask learners to recall the definitions and see if it fits the context. I then ask them to write sentences with the new lexical items , giving them the freedom to change the part of speech.

                                                                                          If a lesson has been lexis-intensive, I make sure to have a gamified plan at the end- crosswords/ wordsearch/ or just guess the word.

                                                                                          This always triggers their excitement at the end of the lesson. Works well with middle graders, but I’m sure can apply to most age groups.

                                                                                          Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                                                                                          I think using visual aids are a good way to present vocabulary. Only thing it could get time consuming for the teacher to gather all such materials. Listening to vocabulary in context is also a great idea, because pronunciation and usage are both being presented simultaneously.

                                                                                          Incidental learning through extensive reading is also a valuable way, as the learners encounter new words/chunks in a setting they are unaware of.

                                                                                          Using cloze exercises for technical/difficult words is also recommended so that learners can practice using the words right away.

                                                                                          Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                                                                                          Yes, there are techniques that are applicable to specific age/proficiency groups.

                                                                                          But common to all, I think applying a creative writing approach and gamifying vocabulary can be very productive across the spectrum.

                                                                                          • #50675
                                                                                            Iroda Saydazimova
                                                                                            Participant
                                                                                                @iroda

                                                                                                I agree with you, Gajinder.  Gamifying vocabulary can be very productive across all ages and levels.

                                                                                              • #50850
                                                                                                Nicholas Northall
                                                                                                Moderator
                                                                                                    @nick-northall

                                                                                                    Hi Gajinder,

                                                                                                    I’m glad you are a fan of extensive reading as I think it is an excellent way to develop both language and skills. However, I don’t think ER should just mean reading books: many people just don’t read books so trying to get our learners to do this, will put them off reading in general. Instead, I believe that they should be encouraged to read anything they are interested in! I am also a huge fan of extensive listening (or indeed watching!) as I think this is more likely to appeal to a lot of learners. Mini plug.

                                                                                                    Cheers,

                                                                                                    Nick

                                                                                                • #50674
                                                                                                  Iroda Saydazimova
                                                                                                  Participant
                                                                                                      @iroda

                                                                                                      1. Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                                                                                                      I often try to present new items in lexical sets, and I use passages as a source of new vocabulary. For example, in my IELTS preparation classes, I chose authentic 2-3-page articles on specific topics (e.g. Tourism, Animal Conservation, Work and Life Balance etc.) and highlight the content words and/or keywords in advance. Their homework will be to read and study the new vocabulary items and summarize the text. To ensure the new vocabulary volume is not overwhelming, I try to control it (10 words max per page). Also, as extra support, I have a Quizlet (app) class where students study the article’s words in different ways: matching, tests, writing etc. Since it shows the leadership board, it is pretty competitive, and students usually like it. Finally, in class, we have a life quiz on this app or another (Kahoot or Quizzis), and they recycle the learned items through productive tasks in speaking and writing.

                                                                                                      I tend to prefer these techniques to teach and test vocabulary because

                                                                                                      a) they are adult learners and have a solid intermediate level (they are autonomous)

                                                                                                      b) it saves so much lesson time if they learn words in advance

                                                                                                      c) students see the new items in context

                                                                                                      d) they keep testing how they learned via various methods in the app

                                                                                                      e) they are more or less at ease using them in their speaking (discussion and speech) and classroom writing (essays).

                                                                                                      2. Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                                                                                                      The techniques I find particularly appropriate/effective for the presentation of the vocabulary items on trends are ‘categorising’ and  ‘describe and draw’ (Harmer, p.267). One of the writing tasks of the IELTS exam requires a report on a diagram (e.g., a line graph). I usually present the vocabulary for trends by getting the students to sort it out according to the patterns (rising, falling, unchangeable and fluctuating). Then, I get them to work in pairs – one student describes the given graph in the handout using the language for trends, while the other tries to draw it following the descriptions of the groupmate. The reasons are as follows:

                                                                                                      – students are more confident about the correctness of the items they have learned as they are sorted into precise sections (i.e., categorising)

                                                                                                      – the output of the taught vocabulary is observable during the same lesson (describe and draw)

                                                                                                      – both students are very attentive and precise in the language they are using to do the task well, and it is also engaging (describe and draw)

                                                                                                      3. Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                                                                                                      As for the vocabulary game ‘backs to the board’, I was mistaken in thinking it works well exclusively with younger learners or those that have beginner or pre-intermediate levels. I tried its variation (Hot Seat) with adults at university with a higher intermediate level, and it has become their favourite vocabulary revision activity since we tried it. Because these are adult learners, it is usually very organized and competitive. They study the vocabulary in advance at home to win the game.

                                                                                                      • #50851
                                                                                                        Nicholas Northall
                                                                                                        Moderator
                                                                                                            @nick-northall

                                                                                                            Hi Iroda,

                                                                                                            Thanks for posting.

                                                                                                            You make some solid points here – I think it is a good idea for learners to read several texts around similar topics so they can come across the same language again and again in context. This is another way of strengthening their understanding and recycling language.  I like how you focus your vocabulary teaching on your learners’ needs – e.g. to pass IELTS. I think backs to the board is an excellent activity (game!) which works with anyone!

                                                                                                            Cheers,

                                                                                                            Nick

                                                                                                        • #50819
                                                                                                          Vasiliki Zinonos
                                                                                                          Participant
                                                                                                              @vasiliki

                                                                                                              Which techniques do you tend to use? Give reasons for your answer.

                                                                                                              I use visual and auditory stimuli, a lot of drilling, categorising/classifying, games, matching, prediction via context etc.  I think it is important to teach lexis in a variety of methods, so that it covers the needs of all learners (auditory, visual, kinaesthetic, etc.) and so that the lesson is more interesting as well.

                                                                                                              Are there techniques that are particularly appropriate for the presentation of certain types of words?

                                                                                                              I think visual aids are a great way to teach vocabulary in general, whether that is through flash cards or online apps (Kahoot, Socrative, etc).

                                                                                                              Are there techniques which are likely to be more or less appropriate for particular learners (e.g. young learners/adults, beginner/advanced, etc.)?

                                                                                                              I think beginners and young learners find it more difficult to classify or match words, unless there is a visual stimuli, so that would correspond better to higher level students. For the same reason, higher level learner would hypothetically perform better in a task where they have to deduce meaning from context.

                                                                                                               

                                                                                                              • #50852
                                                                                                                Nicholas Northall
                                                                                                                Moderator
                                                                                                                    @nick-northall

                                                                                                                    Hi Vasiliki,

                                                                                                                    Thanks for sharing. You make a great point about covering different aspects of a word. As we mention in topic 2, what does it mean to know a word? I certainly think a variety of methods are useful to ensure our learners understand what a word is!  You also touch on ‘learning styles’. A lot has been written on his recently and whether there is actually any academic research to support them. Cambridge recently took out reference to learning styles in the assessment of CELTA replacing them with ‘learning preferences’… What do you think about this?

                                                                                                                    Cheers,

                                                                                                                    Nick

                                                                                                              Viewing 10 reply threads
                                                                                                              • The forum ‘DELTA Module One (Archived)’ is closed to new topics and replies.