Viewing 11 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #53918
      Bashar
      Keymaster
          @bashar

          Now you’ve had a chance to look at the three video tools in action, we’d like you to consider the following questions:

          1. What are the possible advantages and disadvantages of using these tools with our students?
          2. What do these tools offer that perhaps traditional listening lessons can’t?
          3. How do you think your students would react to a lesson using one of these tools?
        • #56291
          Wiputra Cendana
          Participant
              @wiputra

              What are the possible advantages and disadvantages of using these tools with our students?

              Advantage: Giving time to the students to articulate their ideas and fully engage in the given forum. Disadvantage: Sometimes the student that probably the last participant to contribute his or her ideas, they will have few words to say. It would be better if there is any forum to give particular agree or disagree respond.

              What do these tools offer that perhaps traditional listening lessons can’t?

              Recording all the richness of student’s ‘voice’. It was something that we can revisit again.

              How do you think your students would react to a lesson using one of these tools?

              They are mileneal generation that is truly love using technology. We build internet infrastructure as well that will help them to give any digital exposure. I love active participation in the digital setting.

            • #56324
              Gulcin Cosgun
              Participant
                  @ggcosgun

                  What are the possible advantages and disadvantages of using these tools with our students?

                  The possible advantage is that by using these tools we can transform lesson content into an engaging one.

                  What do these tools offer that perhaps traditional listening lessons can’t?

                  We can add comprehension questions that go along with each video, which would be great for checking understanding. We can share these resources with students to watch outside of the classroom and do the production activities in the classroom.

                  How do you think your students would react to a lesson using one of these tools?

                  They would find it interesting and participate more actively in the activities.

                • #56406
                  Gez Edwards
                  Keymaster
                      @gez

                      Thanks for sharing your thoughts @wiputra & @ggcosgun

                      Yes, EdPuzzle and VideoAnt are good for drawing attention to points during the video, whereas TedEd is all about comprehension and discussion after the event. A nice feature of VideoAnt is that students can not only leave a response to an annotation (question or comment) that you’ve added to the video, but they can respond to each other’s responses too. So that’s a nice bit of in-situ interactivity between students.

                    • #56798
                      Dawid Juraszek
                      Participant
                          @dawid

                          The contrarian in me wonders about the disadvantages, and specifically, the inflection point where the use of technology in teaching stops adding value and begins generating risks. This goes beyond (relatively) simple problems of connectivity issues, students’ access to required hardware, or power outages in the classroom (happened to me). These video tools can absolutely help make classes engaging, attractive, and useful, but they also condition students to rely on technology to the extent that may leave them at a loss when the tech is unavailable for whatever reason in real life scenarios.

                          Also, how do we allocate screentime to ensure that, together with all the other online and tech-based activities students already engage in, it doesn’t take over their lives to the degree that is unhealthy for them psychologically? I’ve been using the flipped classroom model for years and I think it’s great, but it does increase students’ exposure to online environments even further. Going through these tasks now, I recall how overwhelmed my own students were when all classes went online due to the pandemic. Just because these young people are “digital natives” doesn’t mean their screentime can be continuously increased.

                          Perhaps these are questions for another module, but I think it’s a good idea to keep them in mind while we discuss these tools.

                        • #56802
                          Sulfikar Sulfikar
                          Participant
                              @upi

                              The advantage is we can visualize some phenomena that would be hard to describe in words. However, this could be a disadvantage as well. In the long run, they might lose their imagination to explain phenomena in writing. Perhaps, to make use of video, we can ask the students to describe a phenomenon before watching a video on the phenomenon. Then after watching the video, ask them to re-think or re-define their description.

                              I used a video by Prof. Brian Cox to explain the basis of quantum theory and the application of the theory in chemistry. Students liked it a lot and had exciting discussions on the beginning of life on earth.

                              I wish I had known about Video Ant before. When I used a video in my classroom, I played and stopped the video every time I needed to emphasize or explain particular scenes in the video or to translate some difficult words in Bahasa. This makes the time required to finish the video longer.

                            • #57074
                              Ian Coleman
                              Participant
                                  @iancoleman81

                                  1. One of the things I’ve always liked about using video is the opportunity to bring some authenticity into the classroom. Gulcin has already mentioned that it can make content more engaging, and I totally agree. I think these tools would allow us to engage students through use of authentic content, and would give them a greater sense that they are learning from and using real world language. It may also encourage them to engage with English language media in their own time, and therefore help them to become more independent learners. As part of a flipped classroom approach, I think they’d work really well.
                                  2. Students can listen at their own pace and “revisit” as Wiputra said. Again, I can see this working well in a flipped classroom approach.
                                  3. Thinking of my current students, they’d probably react with a mixture of curiosity and trepidation. I’m looking forward to trying videoant in particular…

                                • #57190
                                  Gez Edwards
                                  Keymaster
                                      @gez

                                      Thanks for your thoughts, @dawid @upi & @iancoleman81


                                      @dawid
                                      – I think the concerns about screen time are completely valid, and it’s something we all need to consider. Something we always stress on the course is that no single tool or interaction or device is a magic wand, and keeping a balance of device-based tasks and other kinds of interaction is key, and that we can critically justify our use of digital tools. The pandemic was an extreme case and unfortunately led to a lot of bad practice as people tried to rapidly replicate their courses online without consideration for the medium. I hope things have balanced out a little now.


                                      @upi
                                      – Yes, with TedEd, for example, you can add questions before as well as after watching, so you can design these to encourage students to re-examine their initial answers.


                                      @iancoleman81
                                      – Yes, authenticity is really important, isn’t it? If the classroom reflects the world outside it’s surely more relevant to people’s real lives (in terms of content and medium).

                                    • #57232
                                      Dwi Wulandari
                                      Participant
                                          @dwi

                                          I wont add anything new, as I agree that it is the authenticity that highlight the importance of using video. Plus, nowadays we can have tons of video available at you tube, which make the designing of using video easier. also as Pak Wiputra said, students can revisit them as they want. My students like to watch the video and give comment to respond the questions in VideoAnt. I do have similar problem with Bu Upi, that it took time to play long video as I had to stop many times to explain. In this way, then the use of video remains substitution of lecturing, though the comment or students respond may be considered as not only substitution.

                                          • #57250
                                            Gez Edwards
                                            Keymaster
                                                @gez

                                                Yes, as we talked about in our video chat, the nice thing with VideoAnt is that students can respond to the annotations/questions that you add, and students can respond to each other’s comments, so you can have a nice resource, rich with discussions that students can go back to. It’s also perfect for flipping the class: giving the video to students before the class (with your explanations as annotations), so that they can watch it at their own pace. That way, you can use precious class time for higher-order tasks.

                                            • #57522
                                              Nilsa Pereyra
                                              Participant
                                                  @nilsa

                                                  A bit late to reply, though I found interesting reading my classmates points of view.

                                                  Both tools, VideoAnt & TED are usefual and engaging, as well as giving us teachers lots of possibilities to work with and a variety of topics to include in our lessons.

                                                  I’ll try VideoAnt next week, I hope it works fine as most of my students are online ones. After using it as taught in the course, I’ll try to ask my adult students to work on a video themselves, they can prepare the questions and the rest of the class can reply. I think this can give them the possibility to practice their critical thinking skills, while studying the content.

                                                  Dawid brought up a tricky issue in some areas or countries, internet connection and power are not reliable, which is a disadvantage to teacher & students. However, having the possibility of asynchronous teaching/learning students can watch/listen to material when connectivity/power is available. Screen time is another topic I’m concerned about as well. Most of my students prefer watching viedos rather than reading an article or a chapter. So I’m eager to keep learning how to implement IT to encourage them to read from books/journals/papers and ask them to develop the videos/podcasts themselves. I do wonder if that would help.

                                                  Another advantage I see from the tools from this unit is that it involves writing, would it work asking them to write on paper as well? Neuroscience recommends handwriting rather than typing. Is my idea feasible? I’ll see.

                                                   

                                                  • #57525
                                                    Gez Edwards
                                                    Keymaster
                                                        @gez

                                                        Yes, that’s a good point about asynchronous tasks getting around the issue of poor internet connections, Nilsa. Your VideoAnt task sounds like a really rich activity – lots of interactions and sharing and critical thinking. Let us know how it goes!

                                                    • #58304
                                                      Siti Asmiyah
                                                      Participant
                                                          @siti-asmiyah

                                                          What are the possible advantages and disadvantages of using these tools with our students?
                                                          I have a late response to the task yet my experience as students may reflect the experience of my student if later I use the video tools. There are benefits of video tools in which students can catch up with the materials, revisit the materials and bring connection across the materials. Issues related to access technology pointed out by Dawid  may be a hindrance, yet, the opportunity to re-catch the materials once we have the access may be different from, say, when we have synchronous materials in physical class. Once we miss then it will be difficult to go back. Video also enables presentation of more authentic materials and brings possibility for more collaboration. However, I should agree with Wiputra that as students are learning in their own pace, when it comes to giving responses, the last participant to respond (like me) may have fewer words to say.

                                                          What do these tools offer that perhaps traditional listening lessons can’t?
                                                          They offer more differentiated learning, collaboration and freedom to the students.

                                                          How do you think your students would react to a lesson using one of these tools?
                                                          I believe that they will love lesson with video tools. One thing that I need to consider is to use one which is best for them in relation to the learning objectives. I know there are several good video tools but using several tools in the same class may bring burden and more load to the students. I believe that the tools should function as a media for learning, hence, if one tool can already facilitate the attainment of this purpose, then one is sufficient.

                                                          • #58359
                                                            Gez Edwards
                                                            Keymaster
                                                                @gez

                                                                Thanks for your thoughts, Siti, and don’t worry about being late to comment.  As you say, being flexible is one of the major advantages of these tools. Yes, it can take a while to get comfortable with which tool you prefer for what sort of task, and identifying what aspect of the video you want to focus on / what skill you want students to practise.  Each of them has a lot of potential to pack a lot of extra value into a straight video – it’s up to us which aspects we want to enhance.

                                                            • #59724
                                                              Stephen Cartwright
                                                              Participant
                                                                  @stevec

                                                                  1. What are the possible advantages and disadvantages of using these tools with our students?

                                                                  There are lots of advantages such as those already mentioned. I’ve used similar activities in the past in a flipped-classroom model to make use of my students time outside the classroom to build the weaker students’ skills though them needing to listen/watch several times while the stronger students may only need to listen once. Video is also more engaging than text for most people, plus it provides visual support to the aural content.
                                                                  The obvious disadvantages are of course that not everybody has access to a device to play video. Some students these days have a little too much screen time, so while it might have been more ten or som years ago to give students a computer-based activity, these days parents are doing everything in their power to reduce their child’s screen time.

                                                                  2. What do these tools offer that perhaps traditional listening lessons can’t?

                                                                  Visual support.

                                                                  3. How do you think your students would react to a lesson using one of these tools?

                                                                  They’d like it. However, any activity that leads them to pick up a gadget with a screen might lead to the students remaining on that gadget far longer than they intended as they might open up other application such as games or social media.

                                                                   

                                                                  • #59777
                                                                    Gez Edwards
                                                                    Keymaster
                                                                        @gez

                                                                        Yes, we need to be fully aware of the pull of the other attention-grabbing features of devices when we set these tasks up – if we are open about it and clearly establish the parameters for their use, we can hopefully minimise distraction.

                                                                  Viewing 11 reply threads
                                                                  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.