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    • #3836
      Beth Melia-Leigh
      Moderator
          @beth
          • How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?
          • Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?
          • Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?

          Are there any similarities or differences between your response and that of your peers? What can you learn from the other teachers on the course about teaching in different contexts?

        • #34417
          Rayna Rosenova
          Participant
              @rayna

              1. How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?

              The learning and teaching context differs in that the students in the video are adult learners at a lower level, i.e. pre-intermediate, whereas I normally teach young adults, whose level of English is upper-intermediate to advanced, and undergraduates. The other difference would be that in my last ELT context, I was not teaching ESL but a course in IELTS, which in addition to further developing students’ knowledge of English and helping them build on what they have already learned from their ESL classes, focuses on teaching skills and strategies. It also aims to make sure that students master the exam format so that they could obtain the necessary band scores to pursue their chosen studies abroad.

              2. Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?

              I liked the idea of the pre-listening task with a selection of photos that the students had to use to predict what the story would be about. Also, more generally, I liked the idea of the live listening around which the lesson was built.

              3. Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?

              I don’t think the lesson would not work in my (past) teaching context but the tasks should be tailored to meet the specific needs of the students. The pre-listening ‘making predictions’ task would work well but I wouldn’t use ‘home-made’ material such as the one used in the lesson: I would select a text that resembles those given in the exam, or actually pick an authentic one, so that the students have as much exposure to authentic exam material as possible. For a change, I might actually turn a reading passage into listening material and then use the text for additional tasks – for example, such that focus on lexis and discourse markers.

            • #34439
              Joanna Kolota
              Participant
                  @joannak

                  How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?

                  I work with students aged 11-16; they attend an English speaking secondary school which follows national curriculum and the language of instruction is English. The students’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds are extremely diverse; their levels of English and previous schooling experiences also vary. The contexts, therefore, are very different- I think (apologies if my assumptions are incorrect) that the group presented in the video shares the same linguistic and cultural background, they all seem to have the same level of English.

                  Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?

                  I really liked the first activity during which the students were asked to predict what the activity might be about- they were able to actively use any lexis and grammatical structures they knew and felt comfortable using (without being limited to a particular set or being told to use new/unfamiliar ones).I also agree with the teacher who claimed that making learning activities more personal and responsive to the group’s needs and interests is essential when creating engaging and authentic tasks.

                  Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?

                  Unfortunately I don’t have a lot of time to focus on certain grammatical structures/ vocabulary. There are certain parts of lessons when subject specific vocabulary is taught explicitly; grammar usually is presented in context but not studied in depth as it normally happens in EFL/ESL lessons. Some students receive additional support but most of the sessions are content driven, language is simply ‘noticed’.

                • #50795
                  Manuel Flores Lasarte
                  Moderator
                      @manuel

                      Thank you @rayna and @joannak for your responses. As you mention, there are a lot of things from this lesson that can be used in other contexts such as the use of pictures for prediction (as also done by @erica above) or using live listening as a way of making listening more personal and relevant to the students. This idea of relevance to students is interesting because it does not necessarily always mean ‘personal’: it can be relevant if learners find it useful for their study purposes, such as passing an exam even if it is not a topic that it’s personally relevant to them. Indeed, in an exam class, learners may find it more useful to listen to texts and do the tasks that best match what happens in the exam. Having said this, a live listening can work very well as a way of contextualising and introducing new language that could be used in speaking or writing. For example, a teacher can talk about ‘a special day’ as a model and then ask students to do some speaking on their ‘special days’ (a possible question in IELTS speaking).

                      In the case of Joanna’s teaching context, this may be a little bit more complex although perhaps a personal story can introduce learners to something more abstract? (e.g. visiting volcanoes and then describing volcano activity)? Just an idea as I am not too familiar with your teaching context.

                      What do the others think? Any other ideas you would take from the video? Any other points that would not work in your teaching context?

                    • #50830
                      Erica
                      Participant
                          @erica

                          How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?
                          I think it’s got some similarities and differences as well.
                          I also teach adults but not in a monolingual setting. Also, I teach ESOL as opposed to EFL and it differs as in the former Englis is taught to help student function and live in the UK.

                          Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?
                          I really like the “live listening” as it can provide a more “personalised” and natural listening experience. For example, as Robert said (talking about dictation) students could use the teacher as a “human tape recorder” and/or as Harmer said the teacher could read for effects (e.g., with pathos) to engage and stimulate the imagination of the listeners.

                          Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?
                          In general, it may work well. However, the size of my classes is much bigger than the one in the video (I have 25 students in each class) and that may represent an issue, e.g. how many times are they allowed to stop me and/ or ask to repeat? Can everyone hear my voice properly?

                          What can you learn from the other teachers on the course about teaching in different contexts?
                          From what Robert wrote about his teaching context I sense that by teaching in company he has more freedom in terms of what to teach and how. Perhaps you have a small group of students with similar skills and needs which can actually lead to an active engagement of them all. The lessons seem always to be tailored to their likes and needs – as opposed to be shaped by national curriculum guidance and exam requirements.

                        • #50976
                          Gajinder Kaur
                          Participant
                              @gk

                              How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?
                              This was a brilliantly crafted lesson plan, for optimising multi-skills. Unfortunately, I do not have the liberty to craft a lesson plan entirely on my own, just execute it.

                              Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?
                              I would love to steal the live listening! And I personally think he was brilliant in writing out that narrative, and the way he wrote it- very engaging and entertaining.

                              Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?
                              Not really.

                            • #51162
                              Manuel Flores Lasarte
                              Moderator
                                  @manuel

                                  Thank you @erica and @gk for adding your ideas to the discussion. As you mention, a live listening can engage learners while also building rapport with the teacher. If student numbers are high, we can take that into account and position ourselves in a place where everybody can hear us and we can give learners a simple task so that there is no need for too many pauses or repetition. Preparing learners for the listening and doing peer feedback between tasks will also help avoid too many repetitions of the listening. Also, a live listening does not have to be long so perhaps it can be incorporated as a small exercise into a prescribed syllabus?

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