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    • #3836
      Beth Melia-Leigh
      Moderator
        @beth
        • How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?
        • Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?
        • Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?

        Are there any similarities or differences between your response and that of your peers? What can you learn from the other teachers on the course about teaching in different contexts?

      • #34417
        Rayna Rosenova
        Participant
          @rayna

          1. How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?

          The learning and teaching context differs in that the students in the video are adult learners at a lower level, i.e. pre-intermediate, whereas I normally teach young adults, whose level of English is upper-intermediate to advanced, and undergraduates. The other difference would be that in my last ELT context, I was not teaching ESL but a course in IELTS, which in addition to further developing students’ knowledge of English and helping them build on what they have already learned from their ESL classes, focuses on teaching skills and strategies. It also aims to make sure that students master the exam format so that they could obtain the necessary band scores to pursue their chosen studies abroad.

          2. Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?

          I liked the idea of the pre-listening task with a selection of photos that the students had to use to predict what the story would be about. Also, more generally, I liked the idea of the live listening around which the lesson was built.

          3. Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?

          I don’t think the lesson would not work in my (past) teaching context but the tasks should be tailored to meet the specific needs of the students. The pre-listening ‘making predictions’ task would work well but I wouldn’t use ‘home-made’ material such as the one used in the lesson: I would select a text that resembles those given in the exam, or actually pick an authentic one, so that the students have as much exposure to authentic exam material as possible. For a change, I might actually turn a reading passage into listening material and then use the text for additional tasks – for example, such that focus on lexis and discourse markers.

        • #34439
          Joanna Kolota
          Participant
            @joannak

            How is the learning and teaching context similar from/different to the one you currently teach in (or the one you last taught in if you are not teaching at the moment)?

            I work with students aged 11-16; they attend an English speaking secondary school which follows national curriculum and the language of instruction is English. The students’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds are extremely diverse; their levels of English and previous schooling experiences also vary. The contexts, therefore, are very different- I think (apologies if my assumptions are incorrect) that the group presented in the video shares the same linguistic and cultural background, they all seem to have the same level of English.

            Are there any techniques or activities you could ‘steal’ from the teacher to use in your lesson?

            I really liked the first activity during which the students were asked to predict what the activity might be about- they were able to actively use any lexis and grammatical structures they knew and felt comfortable using (without being limited to a particular set or being told to use new/unfamiliar ones).I also agree with the teacher who claimed that making learning activities more personal and responsive to the group’s needs and interests is essential when creating engaging and authentic tasks.

            Are there any parts of the lesson that you think wouldn’t work in your teaching context? Why?

            Unfortunately I don’t have a lot of time to focus on certain grammatical structures/ vocabulary. There are certain parts of lessons when subject specific vocabulary is taught explicitly; grammar usually is presented in context but not studied in depth as it normally happens in EFL/ESL lessons. Some students receive additional support but most of the sessions are content driven, language is simply ‘noticed’.

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