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    • #53919
      Gez Edwards
      Keymaster
          @gez

          Now you’ve had a chance to use one or more of the tools, we’d like you to share your experience. You can make any notes you want, but you might want to think about the following questions:

          1. How easy was it to set up the lesson?
          2. How did your students engage with the material?
          3. In terms of SAMR, do you think the lesson went beyond simple substitution? If so, how?
        • #56292
          Wiputra Cendana
          Participant
              @wiputra

              How easy was it to set up the lesson?

              It takes more time to prepare the lesson before, during, and after class. We need to think strategically and make sure the time that they are explore asyncronusly is not wasting.

              How did your students engage with the material?

              They are trying to dig deeper and put their ideas in the forum that we give. At the face to face meeting, they articulate their ideas and questioning some curiosity which is popped up in their mind.

              In terms of SAMR, do you think the lesson went beyond simple substitution? If so, how?

              Changing the printed textbook into the digital one is truly helpful. Using canva and making it like digital book helps the students a lot to see the best choose quality of the material.

            • #56325
              Gulcin Cosgun
              Participant
                  @ggcosgun

                  How easy was it to set up the lesson?
                  It was easy to set up the lesson because the tool is user-friendly. I did not have any difficulties.
                  How did your students engage with the material?
                  They were attentive throughout the lesson. They were actively involved.
                  In terms of SAMR, do you think the lesson went beyond simple substitution? If so, how?
                  I think the activity was an example of augmentation because rather than giving handouts to students, I used the tool, which made the task more efficient and engaging. The comprehension questions that went along with the video substituted the handout with some functional improvement.

                • #56510
                  Gez Edwards
                  Keymaster
                      @gez

                      Thanks for your comments @wiputra & @ggcosgun

                      Yes, these video tools can be useful to add more interaction between students in the comments (VideoAnt/TedEd), and focus on specific aspects of the recordings (EdPuzzle), which would definitely push it beyond substitution into augmentation.

                    • #56799
                      Dawid Juraszek
                      Participant
                          @dawid

                          I’ve been using videos & flipped classroom for years with my college students. One popular class is on irony and sarcasm: pre-class, students watch an SNL video (transcript provided) and write a one-page analysis of a selected ironic/sarcastic joke (incl. relevant body language, facial expressions, tone of voice). In-class, they discuss their analyses in groups and come up with their own ironic/sarcastic statements. Importantly, I have them handwrite their analyses (these can be shared on paper or as screenshots/photos). Handwriting has profound cognitive and affective benefits, including improved memorisation, better information processing, increased engagement and a sense of fulfillment. It also helps balance the tech-heavy aspects of the class. It can strenghten bonds between students, as they praise or lightheartedly tease one another about their handwriting skills. Having now familiarised myself with the video tools introduced here, I can envisage a post-class task where students annotate the video online to create a common resource for better comprehension and future reference.

                          • #57191
                            Gez Edwards
                            Keymaster
                                @gez

                                That sounds like a fantastic activity @dawid . I think I’d like to join your class. :good:

                              • #59263
                                Dawid Juraszek
                                Participant
                                    @dawid

                                    Thanks, @gez ! Sorry for replying late, I was relocating and only now can give this course my full attention again.

                                • #57509
                                  Ian Coleman
                                  Participant
                                      @iancoleman81

                                      Apologies for my late contribution – work has been hectic!

                                      How easy or difficult was it to create materials? To decide which video you were going to use?

                                      I used Edpuzzle for IELTS writing task 1 (describing processes). In the past, I’ve used “how it’s made” videos on YouTube to show a process, and I was lucky enough to find a few examples of these videos already prepared by Edpuzzle users, which meant that creating my own was fairly straightforward (though still fiddly at times – made easier by knowing that I’d be using it with a few groups, and probably again in the future too).

                                      How confident did you feel setting up the task with the students? Did you experience any difficulties?

                                      No problems really – my students are generally well-prepared with ipads etc, and are tech-savvy enough. A few false starts with the videos as pairs connected to the wifi, but no particular problems with the site itself. In terms of giving instructions for the task, they seemed a little lost but they picked it up quickly and responded well to it.

                                      How did your students react to the lesson? Did they complete the input task before class? Did you notice any difference in their participation in the exploitation lesson, e.g. readier to contribute than normal?

                                      They seemed impressed by the task and were willing to discuss it during the lesson. In particular, they seemed pretty confident with the language point that came out of the video and which I drew their attention to in some of the questions. I think they liked the ‘independence’ involved in the task.

                                      In terms of SAMR, do you think the lesson went beyond simple substitution? If so, how?

                                      I think it was a straight substitution really, maybe augmentation. At least a functional improvement on the way I’d normally present a video. It’d be interesting to get the students involved in the choice of video and in creating questions to share with other pairs / classes.

                                    • #57532
                                      Gez Edwards
                                      Keymaster
                                          @gez

                                          That’s great that they responded well to being given more independence in the activity, Ian. It really bodes well for the next level stuff of creating and sharing their own tasks with other students.

                                        • #57536
                                          Nilsa Pereyra
                                          Participant
                                              @nilsa

                                              I’ve used VirtualAnt and it was pretty easy to developa task. I’ve tried it myself (as I’m running behind schedule in this course) and it was easy to access and comment. Doing so gave me the idea to include guidance for the students when using the tool. I could comment on my student’s reaction next week. I’ll try Edpuzzle next time.

                                              Regarding SAMR: I think it improves the funtion and engagement of a video activity, transforming the way students watch and work on an image.

                                               

                                              • #57815
                                                Gez Edwards
                                                Keymaster
                                                    @gez

                                                    Thanks for posting, Nilsa – Yes, VideoAnt is great for encouraging student interactions asynchronously about specific parts of a video :good:

                                                • #58305
                                                  Siti Asmiyah
                                                  Participant
                                                      @siti-asmiyah

                                                      How easy was it to set up the lesson?

                                                      I used VideoAnt. It was easy to set up the lesson. The I did not create the video myself but took it from YouTube. The longest and hardest part has been on finding the relevant and appropriate material, on point but not too long (as students might get bored watching).

                                                      How did your students engage with the material?

                                                      I am having semester break and the class will start next March 6th. So, I sent the video to my colleagues and past students. They found it interesting and engaging. It is a new experience for them.

                                                      In terms of SAMR, do you think the lesson went beyond simple substitution? If so, how?

                                                      I think it is already on the Modification level as it allows students to comment on other annotation.

                                                      • #58366
                                                        Gez Edwards
                                                        Keymaster
                                                            @gez

                                                            I agree, Siti – I think this constitutes Modification, as you are able to pinpoint specific parts of the video you want your students to focus on and elaborate upon, you can ask questions which expand the scope of the content of the video, and students can respond to your prompts and each other’s ideas in a way that allows for dynamic, peer-to-peer collaboration and the flexibility of differentiation. :good:

                                                        • #59725
                                                          Stephen Cartwright
                                                          Participant
                                                              @stevec

                                                              I just had my first week of teaching in months, and it was a hectic week. My students are kept on a military-style base all week and do not have access to devices, and our Blackboard is not yet up and running, so I’ll only be able to post a video task for them on their VLE once it is.
                                                              I’ve used TED videos in the past and I know it can be time consuming to select videos and create tasks. With some proficiency level students in the past I asked them to choose a video they liked and to create a task out of it, then share it with my and the rest of the class. It was really engaging for them to get involved with constructing a learning task for themselves and their classmates. I’ve since used the tasks they created with other classes.

                                                              • #59776
                                                                Gez Edwards
                                                                Keymaster
                                                                    @gez

                                                                    Yes, it can be very frustrating waiting for VLEs to get set up for new classes when you’re raring to go with all your interactive materials. It sounds like you’ve found a good way around it as things like TEDed can be accessed without the VLE. I like the sound of the TED task, Steve – getting them making quizzes for each other from their favourite videos is excellent for getting them engaging deeply with the source material. :good:

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