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    • #53999
      Nick Murgatroyd
      Keymaster
          @nick

          OK, now you’ve hopefully had the chance to use these tools with students, we’d love to hear how it went (or how you think it’d go if you don’t have students at the moment). Based on what happened, can you briefly:

          • Describe what you and the students did in the lesson.
          • Say how engaging (or not!) the students found the tasks.
          • Reflect on whether this will change your approach to reading/vocabulary development in your lessons.

          And of course, once you’ve done that, please come back to read other teachers’ posts and to add any comments you might have.

        • #60126
          Wiputra Cendana
          Participant
              @wiputra

              Describe what you and the students did in the lesson.

              We were trying to get each step like the video shared. It helps me a lot to know where the positioning of their vocabuary.

              Say how engaging (or not!) the students found the tasks.

              They owned the vocabulary that we list and discuss in the class.

              Reflect on whether this will change your approach to reading/vocabulary development in your lessons.

              I think this approach will build a sense of English input awareness for them as they need to have an academic writing. They need to have enough academic wording.

            • #60259
              Gez Edwards
              Keymaster
                  @gez

                  Thanks for you thoughts, @wiputra – hopefully your students will get a lot of benefit from being able to seek out the high-use words, especially as they specialise in a particular subject.

                • #60388
                  Dwi Wulandari
                  Participant
                      @dwi

                      I also did as suggested in this unit, asking students to paste text on the checker, and the most point being discussed was grammatical points of the words and the collocation. It was pretty engaging, as the students can see many of the collocations they have no idea previously can be collocated with the words they checked. Next time I would love to go further by checking on the thesaurus and the synonym for further use in their writing. I was wondering if we can do that with those checker.

                    • #60610
                      Gez Edwards
                      Keymaster
                          @gez

                          That sounds like it was really productive, @dwi! If your institution has access to Sketch Engine (or I think there is a 30-day free trial), that has a built-in thesaurus: https://www.sketchengine.eu/what-can-sketch-engine-do/ – If you’re interested in investigating corpus tools further, we also run a corpus course with a similar structure to this LTEAP course.

                        • #60612
                          Dawid Juraszek
                          Participant
                              @dawid

                              The clips were very useful by clarifying for me how I might usefully incorporate some of these tools in my classes. Not the ones I teach this semester (English literature), but I may be teaching EAP next term (that’s why I enrolled in this course), so this might come in handy soon.

                              I think filtering out words from different lists can help students not only see which words are worth learning due to their being popular or relevant, but also to help students see ahead towards their future progress in terms of visualising the proportions: how many words they already know and how many they still need to learn (which might be encouraging or discouraging, depending on the mindset).

                              • #60668
                                Gez Edwards
                                Keymaster
                                    @gez

                                    Thanks @Dawid – by the way, after the course is finished, you’ll have access to a scaled-down version of the course that you can go back to and refresh your memory when the time comes.

                                  • #60713
                                    Dawid Juraszek
                                    Participant
                                        @dawid

                                        Great! Very helpful :-)

                                    • #60768
                                      Siti Asmiyah
                                      Participant
                                          @siti-asmiyah

                                          Describe what you and the students did in the lesson.

                                          Some of my research students are interested in corpus linguistics. We then selected several different texts, a group collected several article abstracts from applied linguistics journals, another collected students’ writing and the other collected abstracts from the accounting undergraduate students’ theses.  They then put their collection into WebCorp to generate the word list. The group then compared and contrasted the lists to see if students’ writing, students’ theses and article abstracts have disciplinary words in common. They also identified different words across the group to see if the students align to the words in their disciplinary discourse.

                                          Say how engaging (or not!) the students found the tasks.

                                          The students were very engaged and excited to find out how feasible it is to do research in applied linguistics using corpus.

                                          Reflect on whether this will change your approach to reading/vocabulary development in your lessons.

                                          I have in some sort used corpora in my teaching and will continue using it with more classes.

                                        • #60925
                                          Ian Coleman
                                          Participant
                                              @iancoleman81

                                              After reading an IELTS text about alternative medicine, I got my students (in different groups) to find collocations with relieve, prescribe, diagnose and treat (from the text). The students used Flax to find collocations, chose relevant ones, and made short gap fill sentences to share with other groups to complete. They enjoyed the task, and were quite intrigued by Flax. Definitely engaged by it, but I tried to gamify the activity a bit too to ensure full participation. I’m definitely going to explore Flax further! Really useful for planning, and for getting students to ‘own’ the vocabulary as @wiputra put it.

                                            • #62721
                                              Stephen Cartwright
                                              Participant
                                                  @stevec

                                                  I tried out some of the corpus tools with a text that I was intending to use for a reading test with my intermediate students. The results were rather enlightening, and highlighted the frequency of higher level lexis that the text contained. I instead chose a to use a different text for the reading test. I think it’s easy to over-estimate the ability of our students to cope with texts, and whereas in a lesson the teacher would preteach certain lexical items, in a test this isn’t the case. Our lessons are 35 minutes long at the moment, and we are not able to devote a whole lesson to preteaching lexis for a test. I learnt in this activity that I need to be much more careful when creating tests!

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