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    • #24441
      David Read
      Keymaster
        @david

        Based on the content above, add your responses to the two questions:

        1. As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?
        2. What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

      • #24647
        Allison Dresner
        Participant
          @spottypoppy

          I suppose the drag and drops are easier especially if someone is a fast reader. I found the last task re: the AWL words a little repetitive but for learners they really do show how learning vocabulary is not a simple task and how much is involved in really learning a word – so in this sense they were great.

          The challenges to create are that they are time consuming and for all the different types there are different elements to learn. It is also important to consider the theoretical implications of quiz design – will a drag and drop be sufficient – or do we need to get students to produce something and also repetition.

        • #24648
          sue robbins
          Participant
            @suerobbins

            As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?

            Quizzes offer opportunities for retrieval practice and when coupled with automated feedback can be a good way of supporting memory/learning. Personally, I find it hard to sustain my interest for more than one or two quizzes in a row, especially if the task type is the same.

            What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

            Quizzes seem most suited to testing things with a ‘correct’ answer, which is fine for e.g. word building or the mechanics of referencing, but in other areas might reinforce a prescriptive approach and/or convince learners that focusing on the surface features of writing is important.

            Learners want to do well in tests, and to please. High stakes quizzes that only allow one attempt and/or record marks will encourage them to memorise the ‘correct’ answer and reinforce the idea that there are ‘right’ ways of using their English. This may not tally with the approach taken more widely on the course, meaning the assessment type may not match the methodology.

            I need to give more thought to how many quizzes I use and for what purpose, especially as quizzing tools are built into the VLE and most content creation tools, making it easy to overuse them (or use them for lack of options). It seems difficult to integrate quizzing with a developmental approach. Quizzes might have to be used very sparingly in order not to conflict with an Academic Literacies approach. Am keen to hear others’ Ideas about this.

          • #24719
            David Lincoln
            Participant
              @david-l

              1. Quizzes seem to offer a way of suppporting working memory and can be a fun way of indirect learning, revising previous content and helping to  eliminate anxiety. Although , I find I can become anxious  if I know the scores or incorrect answers  are recorded . Also,  too many certain type of quizzes can become repetitive.

              2. The challenge seems to be to choose the correct type of quiz for the activity or exercise. What is the purpose of the quiz?  How do I engage the learner so that the produce something which is has a development process?

               

               

               

            • #24722
              Thomas Leach
              Participant
                @thomasleach

                1. As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?
                I thought there was a wide variety of activities which engaged the learners which were really useful cementing the target knowledge. The only activity type I wasn’t a fan of was the spelling based one, which I think is just a personal preference rather than it not being useful.

                2. What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?
                I think the biggest challenge is making it clear what the student has to do and showing why it’s useful. Developing activities for the sake of activities might not help the students and similarly, if an activity is overly complicated students might struggle to understand what they have to do.

              • #24725
                Jemima Perry
                Participant
                  @jemima

                  As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?

                  The things that made activities more engaging for me were

                  • Explanations for why things were correct / incorrect – I found it demotivating to be told an answer was wrong without being told why
                  • Getting a score – as a learner I like to know how I’m doing
                  • Drag and drop activities are quite engaging to begin with (the physicality of them is quite satisfying) but they can become boring if used too much
                  • Being told why I’m being asked to do something e.g. in the introduction for the AWL quiz – because this helps me to see the benefit of the activity

                  What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

                  I think one of the main problems is that it is difficult for the teacher to find out what difficulties the students have understanding the content. For example in the first quiz I wanted to question one of the answers but it is not possible to do this. The same with the second one – I think as a student I’d want more information e.g. on the difference between discussion and argument.

                  Another challenge is  creating content that encourages the learner to actually engage mentally rather than just clicking / dragging etc. Having a score at the end might help to overcome this challenge.

                  Quizzes are good for testing recall but it’s  more difficult to use them to test a learner’s ability to use the language.

                   

                   

                • #24753
                  Paula Villegas Verdu
                  Participant
                    @paula_villegas

                    As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?

                    I pretty much agree with all the points @jemima has made. I have to say I started being quite excited about drag and drop but the novelty wore off fairly quickly. I also appreciated having the feedback although in the exercise where you have to identify the mistake in the sentences, I thought the answer key was really confusing :unsure:

                    What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students? l’d say the main challenge is using storyline in general – because it is evil – but I do feel a bit more confident after yesterday’s live session so we’ll see! 

                  • #24933
                    Bernadette Kelly
                    Participant
                      @berniek

                      I agree with Jemima – quizzes are engaging but they can become very repetitive if they are used too much.  Good quality feedback is really important.  Also accuracy in the answer key is crucial – the signposting exercise in week 5 review????

                      Challenges?  – I think time is the biggest challenge – both as a teacher making them and as a student doing them.  Also, over the course of a year I think it is difficult to come up with a range of quizzes that don’t feel like a hamster wheel for the students.  I think making the purpose clear for students – and maybe letting them decide whether it is something worth investing their time in doing (learner control) is important.  So an element of TTT where feedback suggests further activities based on scores  is perhaps helpful.

                       

                    • #24934
                      Caitlin Coyle
                      Participant
                        @caitlin

                        1. As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?

                        I liked the things I’d being doing recently in class as I thought ‘ah, these are relevant’ :-) I agree with the others ‘drag and drop’ is good but it can get a bit monotonous leading to potentially less psychological engagement. I did like the scores at the end but it would be good if it could be highlighted which are your areas to focus on the quiz. I remember with GDPR quizzes I have had to do sometimes they tell you in the practice ones which areas to read over based on wrong answers.

                        2.What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

                        As many have already said time is a challenge, especially when you do not want to be repeating lots of ‘drag and drops’.

                        Like @jemima said I also liked getting the score, but I think it would be of more use if there was a summary at the end saying which areas to revise. I was also thinking though about differentiation and specifically wondering about when it is good to give scores and when it is not.  For basic knowledge and understanding checks like the above quizzes I think giving scores are fine. However, for assessing other thinking and proficiency skills I am not sure.

                        At the moment, I have a class of students with different exit score requirements e.g. some two 6s and two 6.5s, whilst others two  6.5s and two 7s. Due to the fact they are currently in mixed classes and it is just a English for General Academic Purposes part of the course they all do the same listening and reading quizzes/tests, but their results/outcomes are differentiated e.g. a 44/50 in a reading may be  ‘good’ for a student with a lower exit requirement, but a ‘needs work’ for a student with higher requirements. Differentiating by task would be another way to do it but creating quizzes depending on various student entry requirements would be even more time-consuming than creating just one quiz and judging the scores accordingly. I don’t know what the answer is therefore: differentiate by task or differentiate by outcome? I know a third type of differentiation which is by support but I see this more as an in-class thing, but again maybe this is possible asynchronously, not sure.

                         

                      • #25008
                        David Read
                        Keymaster
                          @david

                          @spottypoppy @jemima @paula_villegas @david-l @thomasleach @ptzanni @suerobbins @caitlin @berniek lots of great ideas about quizzes here, and to pick up on a few points made:

                          absolutely right that we have to be careful about overuse of quizzes and avoiding the monotony of the same activity (e.g. drag and drop) again and again. Breaking it up with other types of content and interactions can soften this somewhat, so it’s worth considering that when designing them.

                          And as many of you mentioned, feedback is really important, and giving them the chance to review the quiz afterwards or point them towards areas they need to work on is preferred, though that does require a lot of backend work from the creator. Storyline does allow you to do this, but it is a bit of a learning curve. As with most things, the more learner-focussed and accessible you want to build things, the more time and knowledge will be required to learn the tools/skills to create this.


                          @caitlin
                          I think being upfront with students about the scores would make the most sense, and would reduce the work on your part. Just make sure in the feedback or results page it is clear what different marks would mean to different students. (e.g. if you require 6.5, this score is good etc).

                        • #25032
                          Aline André
                          Participant
                            @aline

                            I prefer the matching quizzes, which seemed to force me to operate at higher-level thinking than the drag and drop quizzes.

                            I agree with what others have said, especially regarding time to develop quizzes. Another difficult aspect of creating quizzes is knowing your audience. Quizzes cannot be too simple, easy because students will soon get bored and demotivated. The opposite is also true, if quizzes are too challenging, students might feel frustrated and give up trying them.

                          • #26415
                            Rachel Beresford
                            Participant
                              @rachel-beresford

                              As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?

                              I found the matching and drag and drop activities most engaging, as they offered a quick and efficient way to consolidate learning. I found the AWL activity a bit monotonous, as the same process had to be repeated six times.

                              What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

                              Using a mixture of different tasks to maintain interest, and also, making sure that the level of challenge is appropriate, so that the tasks are achievable but not too easy. As others have mentioned, the time taken to develop these quizzes is also a factor to consider.

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