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    • #50905
      Juliet Parfitt
      Keymaster
          @juliet

          Based on the content above, add your responses to the two questions:

          1. As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?
          2. What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

        • #51168
          ann clayton
          Participant
              @ann-c

              1. I find the drag and drop fun, especially when answers are clear e.g. definitions. The use of multi media (audio) for the stress exercise provided students with a clear model to follow.  I think too many in one resource would be wearing and reading or listing would help to change the pace of the session

              2.  Challenges; Creating a resource that could then be used as a useful reference tool for students – in a book they would have a written record of their answer for future use, online they might need to be encouraged to take notes/make a screen shot and store it appropriately.

              If a quiz was for a formal test students might be able to cheat on line.

              Too many quizzes without useful feedback/support could dishearten learners if they are not getting the right answers

            • #51222
              Akiko IWATA
              Participant
                  @akiko

                  1. I felt the third one (collocations) was the most engaging because after I have have finished the activity, the answers were shown again in the form of table which make my understanding further.( I felt “Oh I see!”) The activity itself has thinking practice (not just drag the word but have to fill in the alphabet, which I felt “Oh, it’s more difficult than the one before”) and the organised (integrated) four filed in the table which was related each other helped my understanding about the word from four aspects. On the other hand, the first two activities just shows the answers and explanation, and it made me fell like “I’ve finished my task”. My feeling was a bit different. For the third one, I was satisfied when I see the table and final practice.

                  The first one just showed whether the answer was correct or inccorect, and it was a slightly discouraging.

                  Does it mean “engaging” here?

                  By the way, the last comment for the first two which said “ask your teacher for help ..” sounds a constructive suggestion for students with low scores and I’m impressed.

                  2. I think the challenge is the messeges in immediate feedback, because whatever the answer is, we want to make the students see the reason why the answer was correct/incorrect. In addition, it takes time to create practice which is a little bit harder than the previous quizzes (for me at least).

                  I really agree with @ann-c about the possibility of cheating in online. It might depend on the students’ motivation to learn.

                • #51256
                  Akiko IWATA
                  Participant
                      @akiko

                      I want to add one more thing.

                      I came up with another idea on question no. 2 that it might be better to construct the flow backwards starting from the aims and targets on even creating quizzes such as “knowledge quizz” so that the student’s understanding can be developed step-by-step. It means it’s better to organise those flows before we start creating “storyboard”.  We can lose the objetives because it is quite easy to make small chunks and create quizzes using articulate rise, but we still have to keep remembering the goal of the lesson. If this is important, I will add the importance of designing the contents carefully as challenge of creating online quizz.

                    • #51326
                      Helen Shaw-Cotterill
                      Participant
                          @helen-sc

                          I feel like quizzes 1 & 2 give the learner incentive to try as they know the tutor can check their progress and score. However, in quiz 1 & 2 you could just drag and drop anywhere and have a chance of getting some of the answers correct! :scratch:

                          All three seemed to feature Drag and Drop quite heavily so it got a bit samey – but probably more so as I did them consecutively!.

                          As with any activity students do, its important for them to know WHY they are doing it (progress check) and what they gain from it – (your tutor can see your score). Giving feedback is good , especially when it is explained to the learner why their mistake is incorrect. It would be nice if there was some way for students to see last week’s score (for example) so they can compare and try to improve on it.

                          Giving the students only 1 chance to take the quiz is good as it should (hopefully) make them focus a bit better.

                        • #51350
                          Tania Pacheco
                          Participant
                              @tania-pacheco

                              Hi,

                              I quite liked the variety of drag and drop quizzes, although I felt that they were quite easy to do it without thinking and specting to get some of answers correct @helen I agree with you.

                              it felt long the last one – “the academic word list”-  it maybe because it is late night for me and I am so tired. Although, again, I liked the variety of tasks.

                              I also agree with @ann about the idea of encouraging learners to take notes while doing it so they can use it as a future reference for revision. We can claim that the beauty of this type of tasks is that we can practise as many times we want and get better at it (or better at the same tasks) in any case repetition helps when learning a language.

                              My hope is to be able to build something like any of those quizzes, we’ll see :whistle:

                            • #51471
                              Richard Davie
                              Participant
                                  @egq22rd

                                  The following responses struck a chord with me:


                                  @ann-c

                                  • Challenges; Creating a resource that could then be used as a useful reference tool for students – in a book they would have a written record of their answer for future use, online they might need to be encouraged to take notes/make a screen shot and store it appropriately.

                                  I always like the idea of something written in a format the effective content of which can still be saved/printed out (ironically, as I hardly print anything nowadays, but do save a tonne in PDFs). But maybe that’s a matter for the whole course, not for any quiz element within it.


                                  @akiko

                                  • I think the challenge is the messeges in immediate feedback, because whatever the answer is, we want to make the students see the reason why the answer was correct/incorrect.
                                  • the first two activities just shows the answers and explanation, and it made me fell like “I’ve finished my task”

                                  I found the ‘WRONG; here are the right answers’ feedback disoncerting, esp. if there was no chance for a re-try (though obv. if these were for summative assessment, that’s a different matter).


                                  @helen

                                  • All three seemed to feature Drag and Drop quite heavily so it got a bit samey – but probably more so as I did them consecutively!.

                                  In theory, I like the tick-and-bash element of quizzes. However, I want a proportionate match between the labour of producing the answer and the amount of thought it takes me. The drag-and-drop to spell the collocations letter-by-letter of an excess of labour way over learning. But of course, that might not be the case for everyone and every level–but still a point for me to bear in mind.

                                   

                                   

                                • #51650
                                  Linda Roth
                                  Participant
                                      @tinkerbell

                                      1. Drag and drop type activities can be a  fun way of checking previously learnt language or content but they can also be quite irritating (dragging letters into a word – really?) and off-putting by their appearance (two-tone purple?).

                                      I also prefer it if I am allowed to have another go at the activity – it gives me a sense of achievement to get it right the second time around, rather than be left with the feeling “I got that wrong’, which can be demoralising.

                                       

                                      2. The challenges: Most of these are the same as with making any quiz, whether online or not., it’s just that dragging and dropping provides a ‘fun’ element, compared with e.g. drawing a line or completing a chart as with a paper-based quiz.

                                      Providing the appropriate degree of task challenge – enough to engage the learner, but not put them off / making it visually attractive – those colours again! / not focusing on style over substance – the task must be clear and the content meaningful / clarity- making sure that definitions etc. are unambiguous so the task is doable / for revision (i.e. not assessment) purposes, allowing the learner to  re-do the task

                                       

                                       

                                    • #52575
                                      Tim Radnor
                                      Participant
                                          @timr

                                          As a learner, which types of activities did you find engaging and which less so? Why do you think that is?

                                          I agree with @akiko that the most successful activities were ones where there was a table or easy-to-read layout of the language/answers after completing the exercise. I also agree with @tinkerbell that it is good to have another go if you don’t get it right: also, some time-pressured  students might be tempted to just click their answers quickly  and then click ‘check’ as they know they’ll see the answers.

                                          I found the different fomats/colours and layouts of quiz types annoying. I don’t see the reason for having a different layout for each exercise: it detracts from the language/activity. Maybe change format/colours for a new topic, but not every slide.

                                          What do you think are the challenges of creating online quizzes for students?

                                          As mentioned above, record-keeping (or lack of) meaning that the students learn in their short-term memory, but it may have gone by the following week without a review or good note-taking (this is not exclusively a problem of online quizzes, though).

                                           

                                           

                                        • #53116
                                          Amon Ezike
                                          Participant
                                              @amon246

                                              What are the main differences in design and layout between Rise and Storyline?

                                              Rise is design adopts the scrolling technique while Storyline adopts the slide style. The table layout used is easier, drag and drop looked a bit clustered and might put students off.

                                              What kinds of content seem better suited for Rise and which kinds of content are better suited for Storyline?

                                              Storyline is more interactive than Rise, it provides users with good interaction and will be suited for self study courses . In Rise to get students to type their response you either use google docs or padlet but in Storyline it is easy to achieve

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