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    • #47629
      Anastasios Asimakopoulos
      Keymaster
          @anastasios

          Here, you can ask any technical questions you might have about the function we focussed on, Word Sketch Difference. We can clarify things from the guides and/or the practical tasks e.g. if you got different results, couldn’t perform the search, need help to understand your word sketch, etc. We can also answer any questions that arose during any other searches you might have performed on your own for practice.

        • #52448
          Siti Asmiyah
          Participant
              @siti-asmiyah

              At first I found different visualization from the key answer. Then I tried several time by extending the selection (the arrow at the bottom) and found that the selection also influences the visualization. Is that so? Or is it because I haven’t done it correctly?

              • #52482
                Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                Keymaster
                    @anastasios

                    Thank you for your question @siti-asmiyah yes that’s correct. If you click on the arrow to expand and see more collocates, then the visualisation tool will include more of them.

                  • #52947
                    Siti Asmiyah
                    Participant
                        @siti-asmiyah

                        Thank you for the confirmation.

                    • #52481
                      Prisila Mlingi
                      Participant
                          @prisila

                          I have many questions ;-)

                          1. When using these phrases what do they mean exactly in ‘plain English’ ? ( most typical? tends to collocate? that collocate?

                          2. How does one remove the circles on the visualisation function?

                          3. When is one expected to click on the button that shows more examples? I mean the button at the bottom of specific columns.

                          4. Is is correct to say that before one uses the word difference function, one needs to have an idea of the words? Would I be correct to say that the ‘word sketch difference’ has  a confirmatory function?

                          Thank you.

                          • #52483
                            Anastasios Asimakopoulos
                            Keymaster
                                @anastasios

                                Thank you so much for your questions @prisila I’m happy to explain.

                                1. The term ‘typical’ refers to the statistic we use to determine if two words are collocates. SketchEngine uses an association measure called LogDice (maximum score = 14). So, the higher that score is, the more ‘typical’ / stronger the collocation is. Frequency does not always helps us to decide what learners need to focus on. For example,  I used the Brown corpus and search for collocates of ‘good’: ‘good + school’ (LogDice=5.7) vs ‘good + deal’ (LogDice=9.8). You can see how a collocation with higher typicality score might be less predictable and therefore more useful to learn.

                                2. To remove the circles from the visualisation, click on the toggle next to ‘Show word circles’ (see screenshot below)

                                3. There is no answer to that. It’s really up to the user and the findings. Sometimes you might want to click on the arrow and expand to notice more similarities/differences.

                                4. Interesting question, Prisila. For sure, knowing the meaning of the collocates would help one understand the results. Using the BAWE corpus with learners below B1 level would be a challenge as they would have many unknown words. WSD is quite an advanced tool and focusses on linguistic nuances, so I guess a more general corpus such as BNC or Brown would be more suitable for learners in general EFL/ESL contexts.

                                Finally, a clarification on the terms. We use ‘collocate’ as a noun and a verb. So, we can say that ‘example’ of a collocate of ‘good’, or that ‘good’ and ‘example’ collocate.

                                Hope this helps, but do let me know if you have further questions.

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